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Baron von Bone
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« Reply #940 on: Mar 31, 2017, 08:36AM »

No need to digest items one may not even notice. Confabulation secondary to anosognosia is a hell of a thing.

I definitely identify with the sentiment, and while in seriousness my understanding is that we should generally assume people don't actually have given clinical conditions or clinically significant conditions it really is seeming like this crowd may well be an exception to that general rule in this way, and probably some others.
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« Reply #941 on: Mar 31, 2017, 10:27AM »

we should generally assume people don't actually have given clinical conditions

I may or may not have been being facetious... Some broader definitions of anosognosia cover lacunae in perception or cognition not necessarily associated with neurological lesions. Most of us have blind spots, maybe even ones of which we are unaware. I make an effort to test my own, while trying to stay humble about any conclusions I may reach.

Confabulation is still confabulation, though. Among first responders in my neck of the woods, the technical term for some of its more garrulous presentations is "talking ragtime." Sometimes I have found it interesting to just listen to what dementia patients are saying, without judgement or dismissal. There can be nuggets of sense to be gleaned there; it does call for a presence, a balancing act on the slack line between detachment and being engaged in the moment.
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« Reply #942 on: Mar 31, 2017, 12:21PM »

New Yorker cartoon:


“Tell them is fake news, work of moose and squirrel.”

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Robert Holmén

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« Reply #943 on: Apr 01, 2017, 08:35AM »

From a piece in the Failing NYT about the consequences of being an FOT:


Michael Flynn

Of all the American influence-peddlers who’ve been on the payroll of Russian oligarchs, only one is currently seeking immunity before he testifies at a congressional hearing. Remember when Flynn kept yelling “Lock her up!” during the Republican convention? Hehehehehe.
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Baron von Bone
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« Reply #944 on: Apr 01, 2017, 10:45AM »

I may or may not have been being facetious... Some broader definitions of anosognosia cover lacunae in perception or cognition not necessarily associated with neurological lesions. Most of us have blind spots, maybe even ones of which we are unaware. I make an effort to test my own, while trying to stay humble about any conclusions I may reach.
Lacunae = perceptual gaps/blind spots, right? I don't think I'm being pedantic by arguing we all have blind spots, but what I'm thinking of may be a different order as compared to what you're talking about ...
 
Confabulation is still confabulation, though. Among first responders in my neck of the woods, the technical term for some of its more garrulous presentations is "talking ragtime." Sometimes I have found it interesting to just listen to what dementia patients are saying, without judgement or dismissal. There can be nuggets of sense to be gleaned there; it does call for a presence, a balancing act on the slack line between detachment and being engaged in the moment.
It raises a consequential question to me ... psychologists say we can just decide to believe things and then genuinely come to believe them. I'm still skeptical. The notion intuitively seems to be a result of low resolution thinking/categorizing. If we separate and isolate the nuances I suspect we find that there's a distinct quality to chosen "beliefs" and those that are genuine--those we land on only after truly being convinced through more strictly honest and/or responsible means. Of course what's intuitive is often wrong, but if I'm wrong about that "talking ragtime" can result in genuine beliefs about reality that came out of pure fabrications, and it's hard for me to fathom how that could be. Regardless, the entitlement to Alternative Facts™ and such we're seeing from the far right has the potential to be devastatingly toxic, and it seems if pure fabrications can become genuine beliefs about reality they're that much more resistant to correction (not so much an issue for the Alternative Facts™ Crüe, but for those on the fringe or just not already too far detached from external reality ... ).
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« Reply #945 on: Apr 01, 2017, 10:49AM »

Then there's this:
Quote
“When you are given immunity, that means you probably committed a crime,” Flynn, then a top campaign aide to Donald Trump, said on “Meet the Press.”

And this:
Quote
That same month, then-Trump communications adviser Jason Miller said pretty much the same thing.
“Revelations” that Clinton aides “were granted immunity from prosecution in Hillary Clinton’s email scandal shows this was without a doubt a criminal scheme,” he said.

And this:
Quote
Not to be outdone, Trump himself told a rally in Wisconsin around the same time that “The reason they get immunity is because they did something wrong. If they didn’t do anything wrong, they don’t think in terms of immunity.”

“If you are not guilty of a crime,” he said, “what do you need immunity for? Right.”

Oopsy.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/morning-mix/wp/2017/03/31/michael-flynn-in-2016-immunity-means-you-probably-committed-a-crime/?utm_term=.83a8ad5d6902
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« Reply #946 on: Apr 01, 2017, 02:35PM »

Up until 50 years ago or so there was something in the South called the "Yellow Dog Democrat", some one who would always, always vote for the Democrat even if it was a yellow dog. The Southern Democrat agenda of segregation was so dear that nothing else really mattered. They would never vote for the Republicans, the party of Abraham Lincoln, the North and Reconstruction no matter how corrupt or inefficient their local Dem establishment was.

That all turned 180° after Lyndon Johnson and civil rights legislation. Now we have a substantial fraction of the population who might be called Yellow Dog Republicans. The Republican agenda of anti-immigration, anti-abortion and white privilege is an immense draw for them and it's just about impossible for a Democrat to run to the right of that to poach the Yellow Dog vote.
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Robert Holmén

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« Reply #947 on: Apr 01, 2017, 03:04PM »

Up until 50 years ago or so there was something in the South called the "Yellow Dog Democrat", some one who would always, always vote for the Democrat even if it was a yellow dog. The Southern Democrat agenda of segregation was so dear that nothing else really mattered. They would never vote for the Republicans, the party of Abraham Lincoln, the North and Reconstruction no matter how corrupt or inefficient their local Dem establishment was.
The way I heard it explained is that they'd vote for the Democrat even if they ran a yellow dog. As I understand it though, what you're talking about is a Dixiecrat (a Southern Republican before the Dixiecrat leadership finally decided they should align with the party that best reflected their regressive views).
 
That all turned 180° after Lyndon Johnson and civil rights legislation. Now we have a substantial fraction of the population who might be called Yellow Dog Republicans. The Republican agenda of anti-immigration, anti-abortion and white privilege is an immense draw for them and it's just about impossible for a Democrat to run to the right of that to poach the Yellow Dog vote.
The umbrella terms for these people are ideologue and/or dogmatist ... intellectual coward also works when the subject is also a Deplorable and demonstrating the fact, or when a blast of pointed accuracy/blunt honesty may work to get the point across a bit more effectively for the target audience (which isn't likely the Deplorable, since it's usually pointless to try and encourage or advocate actual honesty and integrity with them--only their counterfeits within the given ideology/dogma that defines their "thinking" and perceptions).
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« Reply #948 on: Apr 01, 2017, 03:54PM »

Up until 50 years ago or so there was something in the South called the "Yellow Dog Democrat", some one who would always, always vote for the Democrat even if it was a yellow dog. The Southern Democrat agenda of segregation was so dear that nothing else really mattered. They would never vote for the Republicans, the party of Abraham Lincoln, the North and Reconstruction no matter how corrupt or inefficient their local Dem establishment was.

That all turned 180° after Lyndon Johnson and civil rights legislation. Now we have a substantial fraction of the population who might be called Yellow Dog Republicans. The Republican agenda of anti-immigration, anti-abortion and white privilege is an immense draw for them and it's just about impossible for a Democrat to run to the right of that to poach the Yellow Dog vote.

The 'yellow dog Demcocrat' formulation is a good analogy to what's happening now. I don't care who it is; he's right because he's a Democrat gave way to I don't care who it is; he's right because he's a Repbublican then to I don't care who it is; he's right because he's Tea Party.

Now it's changing to I don't care who it is; he's right because he's helping Trump, and these are largely the same voters. What's interesting is seeing it happen in real time, and with lightning speed.

Trump's war against the Freedom Caucus is especially awkward for the writers and commentators who have publicly defended the FC and the Tea Party against the GOP establishment and Obama, because the Freedom Caucus members are doing exactly what they've always done and are standing on principle.

Unlike Trump voters, who can conveniently forget their previous principles while they look around the trailer house for their opioids and their teeth, these journalists are on record saying they support these principles, and if they start attacking the Tea Partiers now, in order to kiss up to the Trump trash they'll be obvious hypocrites. This is only going to get worse on budget issues. The Freedom Caucus is already blinking a little, but I don't think they'll let Trump run up huge deficits without a fight.
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Baron von Bone
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« Reply #949 on: Apr 01, 2017, 04:53PM »

The 'yellow dog Demcocrat' formulation is a good analogy to what's happening now. I don't care who it is; he's right because he's a Democrat gave way to I don't care who it is; he's right because he's a Repbublican then to I don't care who it is; he's right because he's Tea Party.
 
Now it's changing to I don't care who it is; he's right because he's helping Trump ...
Not to be confused with I don't care that he doesn't agree much with me, he's better than the only other viable option.
 
Trump's war against the Freedom Caucus is especially awkward for the writers and commentators who have publicly defended the FC and the Tea Party against the GOP establishment and Obama, because the Freedom Caucus members are doing exactly what they've always done and are standing on principle.
 
Unlike Trump voters, who can conveniently forget their previous principles while they look around the trailer house for their opioids and their teeth, these journalists are on record saying they support these principles, and if they start attacking the Tea Partiers now, in order to kiss up to the Trump trash they'll be obvious hypocrites. This is only going to get worse on budget issues. The Freedom Caucus is already blinking a little, but I don't think they'll let Trump run up huge deficits without a fight.
The only significant difference between some of those writers and their domestically mobile, dentally moderate readers ( ... well, listeners) is their level of literacy and realized income potential.
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« Reply #950 on: Apr 01, 2017, 07:19PM »

Yeah, "Dixiecrat" was the more polite, NYT, WSJ version of that term.
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« Reply #951 on: Apr 02, 2017, 03:16AM »

Resignation rumors starting...

TWITTER RUMOR: Trump considering options including resignation/ RNC Steele: Trump won't finish term
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Robert Holmén

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Baron von Bone
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« Reply #952 on: Apr 02, 2017, 11:18AM »

There's nothing like his own vapid ramblings to demonstrate ... well, his rambling vapidity (compiled by Xylop on the Sam Harris Forum):
 
“I’m speaking with myself, number one, because I have a very good brain and I’ve said a lot of things.”
“I’m very highly educated. I know words; I have the best words.”
“My IQ is one of the highest — and you all know it! Please don’t feel so stupid or insecure; it’s not your fault.”
“I know more about ISIS than the generals”
“Nobody knows more about taxes than I do, maybe in the history of the world.”
“I know more about foreign policy than anybody running.”
“I’m the best thing that’s ever happened to the Secret Service.”
“I will be the greatest jobs president that God ever created. I tell you that”
“I would build a great wall, and nobody builds walls better than me, believe me”
“And by the way, just so you know, I am the least racist person, the least racist person that you’ve ever seen, the least.”
“All of the women on The Apprentice flirted with me – consciously or unconsciously. That’s to be expected”
“No one has more respect for women than me.”
“I would be the best for women, the best for women’s health issues.”
“No one has done more for people with disabilities than me.”
“I have the best temperament or certainly one of the best temperaments of anybody that’s ever run for the office of president. Ever.”
“Everything I’ve done virtually has been a tremendous success.”
“After I beat them, I’m going to be so presidential, you’re going to be so bored, you’re going to say, this is the most boring human being I’ve ever interviewed.”
“The doctor said, ‘Man you have the blood pressure of a great, great, athlete who is 20 years old. 110, I like that, because I like being a great athlete.”
“Nobody reads the Bible more than me.”
And when he was asked his favorite verse: “Well, I think many. I mean, you know, when we get into the Bible, I think many. So many,” he responded. “And some people—look, an eye for an eye, you can almost say that.” The man’s favorite bible verse is an eye for an eye.
“Beyonce and Jay Z, I like them, I like them … I get bigger crowds than they do. It’s true. I get far bigger crowds.” – it’s not true and he’s the only one that cares
Says he won the second debate with Hillary Clinton “in a landslide” in “every poll.” – he lost in every major poll.
“I’m beating (Kelly Ayotte) in the polls by a lot.” – he was not even close – not that it matters to anyone but him
The Colorado caucus system for selecting Republican delegates is “rigged.” – when he lost the primary
The election was rigged when he thought he might lose
The Emmy’s were rigged when the apprentice didn’t win
“Out of 67 counties (in Florida), I won 66, which is unprecedented. It’s never happened before.” – in the past few decades, 3 candidates won all 67 and a 4th won 66.
“The Trump Winery near Charlottesville, Va. is the “largest winery on the East Coast.” – It’s not even the largest in Virginia.
“Upstate New York I poll higher than anybody ever.” – he didn’t even poll higher than Clinton and he lost there 56 percent to 33 percent
“We had a massive landslide victory, as you know, in the Electoral College” He won the electoral college by 7%. That margin is in the 46th lowest out of 58 elections .
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« Reply #953 on: Apr 02, 2017, 03:24PM »

The (lying) print media takes a stand!  From today's Los Angeles Times:

http://www.latimes.com/projects/la-ed-our-dishonest-president/#nt=oft02a-2la1

Of course the country still remains deeply divided - even here in California.  The responses to this editorial seem sort of evenly divided between supporters of the Times's arguments - and unrepentant opponents, Clinton-haters, and Obama-haters.  Lots of the latter have cancelled their long-standing LA Times subscriptions and will, I presume now get all their "information" from Fox News, Breitbart News, Twitter, etc.

3 more episodes in the Times editorial series to come. 
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« Reply #954 on: Apr 02, 2017, 05:58PM »

There's nothing like his own vapid ramblings to demonstrate ... well, his rambling vapidity (compiled by Xylop on the Sam Harris Forum):
 
“I’m speaking with myself, number one, because I have a very good brain...


When I was a boy, a politician just had to misspell "potato" to kill his career.
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Robert Holmén

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« Reply #955 on: Apr 02, 2017, 06:07PM »


When I was a boy, a politician just had to misspell "potato" to kill his career.

When I was a boy it was a shoe with a hole worn in the sole.



"Mr. Potatoe" is no Jack Kennedy. ;-)
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« Reply #956 on: Apr 03, 2017, 06:35AM »




Trump's Base Support Begins To Erode

Analysis of Gallup trend...



But it isn't just Gallup...

Quote
Even Rasmussen now has Trump down at 43% approval, his lowest rating yet.

For years Rasmussen has specialized in various synthetic or questionable metrics, most of which have the effect of bolstering favored candidates.

...“strongly disapprove” is at 47%. Almost half of Rasmussen’s already skewed sample “strongly disapproves” of President Trump.


But things aren't all bad.  Marist notes...

Quote
...83% of Trump’s Republican base, down from 96% previously, believe Trump is fulfilling campaign promises.

83% is still a lot.
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Robert Holmén

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Baron von Bone
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« Reply #957 on: Apr 03, 2017, 08:00AM »

But things aren't all bad.  Marist notes...

83% is still a lot.

It's also likely clinically significant.
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« Reply #958 on: Apr 05, 2017, 12:09PM »

Rare move toward sanity...

Trump Removes Stephen Bannon From National Security Council Post

Quote
WASHINGTON — President Trump reshuffled his national security organization on Wednesday, removing his chief strategist, Stephen K. Bannon, from a top policy-making committee and restoring senior military and intelligence officials who had been downgraded when he first came into office.

The shift was orchestrated by Lt. Gen. H.R. McMaster, who was tapped as Mr. Trump’s national security adviser after the resignation of Michael T. Flynn,



But I'm sure Mr. Bannon will still have the President's full attention for the other six days and 23 hours of the week.
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Robert Holmén

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« Reply #959 on: Apr 05, 2017, 12:11PM »

But I'm sure Mr. Bannon will still have the President's full attention for the other six days and 23 hours of the week.
Working hours... that's probably more like 9 for the weekly total.
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