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1080851 Posts in 71544 Topics- by 19060 Members - Latest Member: Areon Tomek
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Poll
Question: Can you play an H
yes - 28 (71.8%)
no - 0 (0%)
maybe - 1 (2.6%)
perhaps - 2 (5.1%)
I don't know. - 1 (2.6%)
H should be banned! - 3 (7.7%)
I think so. - 4 (10.3%)
Total Voters: 39

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Author Topic: The note H  (Read 4429 times)
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Lou Natunze
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« Reply #20 on: Apr 10, 2017, 01:57PM »

How else would we play shostakovich's signature (D, Es, C, H)?
  b


I had to get used to this working in Germany. It can get a little odd when you have international parts that have been corrected the "b" above a note and you have to work out if they mean "Bb" or "B natural/ H".

The German system uses "s" to signify flat and "is" to signify sharp.
C# is cis (spoken siss)
Eb is es (ess)
F## is fisis (fississ)
Ab is as (yep..)
Bb is however b and B is H.
B#? his (hiss)
Bbb was an argument we had at work the other day. My colleagues couldnt agree whether to call it Beses or Heses. Technically you could probably also say Bes but thag wiuld just confuse every one.

I think we ended up agreeing to call it beses amongst ourselves. There probably is a rule but we're trombonists, not musicologists.

<Edit: Fixed note>

I say, when in Rome . . .



The German letter H is pronounced "ha".

I haven't yet located the plural form of "ha".

( Could it be "haen", "haer", or "hanner" ? )

But if I were to choose to use H, 
 
I would go with the correct German pluralization of Ha ! 

Or you could all be scamps, and refer to it as "Funny Music". 
 
(Ha, ha, ha, ha ! Oh,  I just can't stop laughing ! )

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Lou Natunze
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« Reply #21 on: Apr 10, 2017, 02:27PM »

You mean my tuning note? 

Did you have to file down your tuning slide quite a bit in order to be able to say that ?
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Lou Natunze
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« Reply #22 on: Apr 10, 2017, 02:54PM »

If there is any one system I dislike and refuse to use, It's the European system that switched out B-natural for H.

HALLO!

H comes AFTER G!!!  Amazed

Perhaps they switched out H♭ for B !
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« Reply #23 on: Apr 10, 2017, 04:10PM »

If there is any one system I dislike and refuse to use, It's the European system that switched out B-natural for H.

My choice is undoubtedly the British/Australian system of naming note lengths. It boggles my mind how such a woefully antiquated system hasn't been left in the past where it belongs. Which makes more sense, "hemidemisemiquaver" or "64th note"? I'll take "reasonable fractions that anyone can understand" for $200, Alex.
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« Reply #24 on: Apr 11, 2017, 11:24AM »

My choice is undoubtedly the British/Australian system of naming note lengths. It boggles my mind how such a woefully antiquated system hasn't been left in the past where it belongs. Which makes more sense, "hemidemisemiquaver" or "64th note"? I'll take "reasonable fractions that anyone can understand" for $200, Alex.

Back when I was a bandleader on cruise ships I ran into this issue with a british pianist who had to ask me to clarify what an 1/8th note was after some instruction I gave. That band had people from all over the world in it and he was the only one who didn't know what an 1/8th note was (i still think he was just putting me on.) I hate the word "crotchet" because of him.
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BGuttman
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« Reply #25 on: Apr 11, 2017, 12:31PM »

Since Berklee eliminated the Bb (B on German music), maybe we can replace it with "Hes" (sounds like a brand of Gasoline in the Northeast US).
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Bruce Guttman
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Lou Natunze
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« Reply #26 on: Apr 13, 2017, 10:28PM »

This is taken from a Wiki article in German, translated by Google and tweaked a bit by me. I hope the special characters will still look right.

"In the Middle Ages, the first seven letters of the alphabet were sufficient to characterize the tone inventory used. At the latest in the eleventh century, Guido of Arezzo established a cleavage of the tone B in a higher ( b durum ) and a deeper variant ( b molle ), characterized by an angular ♮ ( b squaerum ) and round ♭ ( b rotundum ) shape of the letter b. From the b quadratum today's resolution sign and the cross emerged, from the b rotundum the displacement sign b .

Because of the optical similarity of the b squareum with the letter h and the subsequent use of the printing type h for the b squareum, in the 16th century in Germany, Scandinavia, and the Westslaw region the designation H for the 7th stage of the basic scale was used ( which since Zarlino (1571) commonly started with C )."

And now lets look at some German Black Letter fonts.

The first word on each line is   "Schristbeispiel".


Now in this first word,  consider letter no. 3, an "h", and letter no. 8, a "b".

Do really think you could differentiate between the two if the printing press was not printing cleanly ?

The fourth line down,  Schristbeispiel Deutsche Anzeigenschrist, is the one
I've seen the most often in musty old textbooks.

With this one, a capital "A" looks like a stylized capital "U",
and a capital "D" and a capital "O" look oh so very similar !

Now the "durum", "molle", "squaerum", and "rotundum" versions of "b" will probably take me quite a while longer to hunt down.



« Last Edit: Apr 14, 2017, 03:02PM by Lou Natunze » Logged

oslide

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« Reply #27 on: Apr 14, 2017, 03:05AM »

The first word on each line is   "Schristbeispiel".

If you look closely it's actually "Schriftbeispiel", i.e. "font example".

The "f" and "s" of those fonts were very similar, both looking like a "∫", but the "f" having a slash, and the "s" not.

May look terribly confusing, but when you're used to it it's not a problem.
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MikeBMiller
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« Reply #28 on: Apr 14, 2017, 07:40AM »

I have been told that I sound like H on many occasions.
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BGuttman
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« Reply #29 on: Apr 14, 2017, 11:25AM »

I have been told that I sound like H on many occasions.

Gee, that's good.  People tell me I sound like S Evil
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Bruce Guttman
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