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Author Topic: Slide on the floor. How bad is it.  (Read 1754 times)
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john sandhagen
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« Reply #20 on: Feb 11, 2017, 08:10AM »

I'm going to disagree.  Many crooks are soft, many are thin, some are both.  Almost all the slides I see are wider at the crook be it because of the floor, music stands, the back of a clarinet players head...

Minor impacts can caus small changes over time.  Also the weight of horns varies greatly...but unless you consider your instrument disposable, it's not a good idea.
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John Sandhagen,
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LowrBrass

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« Reply #21 on: Feb 11, 2017, 02:47PM »

Re: laying a horn down flat (NOT crooks or stands):

Speaking as a layman-- I know the slide-on-the-floor setup is "wrong," but I do it anyway, because the three-point horn-on-the-floor setup makes me cringe.

(1) Slide sticking way up in the air, just like when you stick your leg out to intentionally trip someone? Like nobody's going to trip over that? I have this vision of a mangled slide and a broken hip every time I see it. *shudder* 
In my head, slide-on-the-floor will be less of a horrorshow for both the tripper and the trombone if someone DOES accidentally step on it.
And it seems less likely that someone will accidentally walk into the slide, if the slide isn't waving around a foot above the floor.
(I don't know if that's actually how it would work. I welcome compelling evidence to the contrary.)

(1a) I have some slide tenons that aren't super tight. I see the three-point setup relying on a certain stability of that joint. I see my tenon giving way and slamming my slide onto the ground. (Hasn't happened. This is just the horrorshow in my head.)

(2) Mouthpiece on the floor? And I'm gonna put that on my face? No thank you.


Caveat:
I won't even consider laying my horn on the floor unless there's a nice soft carpet beneath it, and nobody but me is around to trip on it. And it only ever stays on the floor for a maximum of 20 minutes (if I'm in the middle of practicing and the phone rings).


Another thought:
I have doubts that 20 minutes of a horn gently sitting in any stable position is enough to damage it, in and of itself. This sounds like the old "when you put your trombone on a stand, gravity + the weight of your trombone are actually damaging your bell" thing. I believe human klutziness is a far worse and more immediate threat to my horn.
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Lou Natunze
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« Reply #22 on: Mar 03, 2017, 03:38PM »

As I see it, the Mnozil Brass Player have two distinct advantages over the common man:

1)   They are acting as "Beta" users of the new Schagerl Brass instruments that they helped to engineer.  They can always obtain a fresh horn, while their recently injured one gets processed by the instrumental Coroner.
[Well, not Wilfried Brandstötter]


2)   They can provide verbose provenance to accompany their damaged instruments to the Auction House and can possibly obtain a higher sum of money for them than Schagerl would have originally asked for each horn.


"This slide was slightly crushed between the big toe and the second toe of Leonard Paul's right foot when he performed 'Lonely Boy' at  Lawrence University in Appleton, WI on the date of Mar 29, 2017."

"I have film."


Think about the possible resale value of all those wooden soprano recorders they toss over their shoulders !  Being careless is an integral part of their Slap-Stick filled performances.

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« Reply #23 on: Mar 17, 2017, 09:38AM »

Oops, that is spelled Leonhard Paul, not Leonard Paul!
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mwpfoot
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« Reply #24 on: Mar 17, 2017, 10:44AM »

FWIW, every top level pro I've seen live in the last few years does this, sometimes for entire orchestra concerts.

Nice work if you can get it.

 :D
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« Reply #25 on: Mar 18, 2017, 10:13AM »

When I have an alto and a tenor, one has to be someplace when I play the other. MP on the floor is dirty. My preference is under my chair between my legs. Setting the horn down in a protected place is better then sticking up as a trip opportunity. 
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harrison.t.reed
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« Reply #26 on: Mar 18, 2017, 10:25AM »

Lol if you have two instruments use a stand.
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