Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length

 
Advanced search

1087046 Posts in 71973 Topics- by 19232 Members - Latest Member: Bach to the future
Jump to:  
Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 [6]  All   Go Down
Print
Author Topic: Being Self-Taught  (Read 10898 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
watermailonman

*
Offline Offline

Location: Sweden
Joined: Aug 1, 2004
Posts: 1421
"Do your best and then do better"


View Profile WWW
« Reply #100 on: Nov 03, 2016, 04:22AM »

Oh, I am!

He knows I like playing ballads with accompaniment and encourages me. He coached me into becoming very familiar with a few to the extent that I can experiment playing them in different styles.

Currently, I am listening to recordings to identify what basic elements makes a trombone artist unique from others. So now I am trying to play a couple ballads kinda the way Carl Fontana, Ira Nepus or Harold Betters might play them. Naturally, I can't keep up with their technique when they are on a roll. But it's a heck of a lot of fun attempting to play the ballads with some basic elements I have identified from each style. So for example, when I play a ballad with a basic Carl Fontana style, I'll try to mimic his articulation, lip vibrato and try to find notes that you wouldn't think could sound nice, but do anyway.

...Geezer

Sounds like you are having fun. This is high level thinking. A good way to analyze trombone playing.
Good for you also to have found such an inspiring teacher

/Tom
Logged

Listen to my playing on soundcloud https://soundcloud.com/user-796193724
Visit my page at https://sites.google.com/site/brazzmusic/

Instruments: King 2b+, Kanstul 1570, Kanstul 1662. m-pieces: Bach 6 3/4, Hammond 12 ML, Hammond 20 BL
EWadie99
The Curious One

*
Offline Offline

Location: Sterling Heights, Michigan
Joined: Jan 22, 2016
Posts: 500
"Bass Trombone! It's like a musical bazooka!"


View Profile
« Reply #101 on: Nov 03, 2016, 04:48PM »

I am also self-taught and all I do is watch videos of trombonists doing what they do for their daily warm-ups and I also apply to them and do so as followed.  I did had a Skype chat with Doug of mouthpiece advice and now I practice buzzing on the mouthpiece and also apply it to the horn and it has worked for me so far for my needs as a developing player. 

FWIW,

Ethan

   
Logged

Ethan Wadie
Adlai E. Stevenson High School
Adlai E. Stevenson High School Titan Marching Band
Adlai E. Stevenson High School Jazz Ensemble
Adlai E. Stevenson High School Wind Ensemble
Bones:
Besson BE 639
Getzen 1062FD
Geezerhorn

*
Offline Offline

Location: PA
Joined: Feb 9, 2012
Posts: 5557
"Lego My Trombone"


View Profile
« Reply #102 on: Nov 03, 2016, 05:19PM »

Sounds like you are having fun. This is high level thinking. A good way to analyze trombone playing.
Good for you also to have found such an inspiring teacher

/Tom

It IS fun! I'm not very good at it, but that doesn't stop me. After all, I'm in the privacy of my own home in my basement music studio. So as long as my wife doesn't complain...

It's admittedly over my head at present. I can't sustain a player's style for very long on an unrehearsed ballad I pull out of Band-in-a-Box for practice. So I start out and go as far as I can, then switch over to another player's style and see how far I can go with that in a round-robin kinda way, with my limited ability. But it's not only fun, it's excellent ear training - the listening and then the application.

And for me, it's a double-punch. I'm not only practicing style imitation, I'm working on a certain amount of improv at the same time. So it really gets deep quickly. How would so-and-so improv on this piece. If someone knowledgeable heard me, they would probably laugh and say, "Well, that's really not how so-and-so would do it. But at least you're trying". 

I just finished a session this evening. I was a good boy. First I did my homework assignment my teacher has me on. Then I worked on some outside band material. Then I was free to have at whatever I wanted to do until my chops wore out.

I am also self-taught and all I do is watch videos of trombonists doing what they do for their daily warm-ups and I also apply to them and do so as followed.  I did had a Skype chat with Doug of mouthpiece advice and now I practice buzzing on the mouthpiece and also apply it to the horn and it has worked for me so far for my needs as a developing player. 

FWIW,

If you have the ability to self-teach, more power to you! I do - to a point. When I felt I had hit that point is when I found a terrific instructor. Now I can still self-teach and learn from my instructor as well. Progress is coming quickly.

...Geezer

Logged
Geezerhorn

*
Offline Offline

Location: PA
Joined: Feb 9, 2012
Posts: 5557
"Lego My Trombone"


View Profile
« Reply #103 on: Nov 04, 2016, 06:01AM »

Here's a really good example of style to imitate:

Carl Fontana plays "If I Only Had A Brain"

If we listen carefully and take mental style-point notes, probably a lot of us students could play in a style similar to his as he plays the melody through - at least the first time.

I didn't know I could even stand a chance at doing this kind of aping until my instructor inspired me. Listening plays a big role. I know it's been posted by various players - the need to listen well and often to other 'bone players. But it's one thing to see it in print and yet another to hear an inspiring instructor relate how he makes it a point to listen every single day. I now make time in the morning over a cup of coffee to listen.

...Geezer
Logged
andyincov
*
Offline Offline

Location:
Joined: Oct 22, 2016
Posts: 51

View Profile
« Reply #104 on: Nov 22, 2016, 02:36PM »

Very interesting reading all this. I taught myself to play the banjo through tabs, visiting places like this dedicated ti the banjo, being obsessed and most importantly, playing for hiurs on end with other musicians, having fun.

I have only played trombone for 4 weeks now but plan to apply the same techniques and see what happens.  I can feel the obsession BUILDiNG!
Logged
Davidus1

*
Offline Offline

Location: St. Louis, MO
Joined: Jan 5, 2014
Posts: 36

View Profile
« Reply #105 on: Feb 19, 2017, 07:26PM »

I am a tuba player, retired from the Army.  I played some trombone in jazz groups while in the Army but only for about 3 years.  I am self taught on trombone mostly because of not being able to afford lessons when I first started on bone.  I have watched a lot and asked a lot of questions of other players which has helped me learn.  I am still learning trombone and recently have begun playing in a local big band.  If I were a younger player I would definitely seek out an instructor when possible.  I have appreciated reading all of these responses and hearing how everyone got their start in playing.  Its interesting to hear how we all arrive at the love of playing.   Thanks for sharing!
Logged

Conn Victor 5H
Yamaha 354
Wessex Bass Trombone (King 7B style)
Wessex Tenor Trombone (.500)
Conn 15I Euphonium
Mack Brass TU200 BBb Tuba
Geezerhorn

*
Offline Offline

Location: PA
Joined: Feb 9, 2012
Posts: 5557
"Lego My Trombone"


View Profile
« Reply #106 on: Feb 19, 2017, 07:35PM »

I am a tuba player, retired from the Army.  I played some trombone in jazz groups while in the Army but only for about 3 years.  I am self taught on trombone mostly because of not being able to afford lessons when I first started on bone.  I have watched a lot and asked a lot of questions of other players which has helped me learn.  I am still learning trombone and recently have begun playing in a local big band.  If I were a younger player I would definitely seek out an instructor when possible.  I have appreciated reading all of these responses and hearing how everyone got their start in playing.  Its interesting to hear how we all arrive at the love of playing.   Thanks for sharing!

 Good!

One thing. I'm 68. About four months or so ago, I enlisted the aid of a private instructor - Bob Riddle - on this Forum. He's amazing and I wish I had started instruction with him years instead of months ago. It's never too late for older guys to do what younger people think nothing of doing.

Being self-taught is fantastic. But being part of a legacy of instruction going back about 100 years or so trumps it all. Can't beat that.

...Geezer
Logged
Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 [6]  All   Go Up
Print
Jump to: