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Author Topic: A brief retrospective  (Read 1380 times)
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wkimball
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« on: Mar 06, 2017, 09:29AM »

This morning I compiled this brief retrospective showing some of the historical trombone activities from one, two, three, four, and five centuries ago. It provides a somewhat unusual perspective. Enjoy!

http://kimballtrombone.com/2017/03/06/trombone-century-ago-two-centuries-ago-five-centuries-ago/
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robcat2075

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« Reply #1 on: Mar 06, 2017, 09:33AM »

Are those two extra loops on the trombone tuning crooks or just unfortunate accidents?

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Robert Holmén

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BGuttman
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« Reply #2 on: Mar 06, 2017, 09:56AM »

Double loops like that were used on bass trombones to eliminate extremely long lengths of tubing over the shoulder.  The Praetorius picture of the different sizes of trombone shows a trombone with similar loops.

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Bruce Guttman
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robcat2075

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« Reply #3 on: Mar 06, 2017, 10:14AM »

What does the thin rod, that seems to extend from about the grip to the far end of the extra loops, do?
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Robert Holmén

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wkimball
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« Reply #4 on: Mar 07, 2017, 01:15PM »

Honestly, I don't know. I've wondered the same thing myself. Here's another image that includes a rod like that--this one on a horn without the extra loops (tortils).
1663—Augsburg, Germany: Franz Friedrich Franck (1627-1687), Musikstilleben (Music Still Life)

http://kimballtrombone.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/10/FFF-still-life1.jpg
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matto

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« Reply #5 on: Mar 07, 2017, 01:18PM »

What does the thin rod, that seems to extend from about the grip to the far end of the extra loops, do?

It's the sackbut version of a harmonic pillar...  :D
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Matt Hodgson
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« Reply #6 on: Mar 08, 2017, 02:21AM »

What does the thin rod, that seems to extend from about the grip to the far end of the extra loops, do?

Could they be to extend a slide in one of the loops to increase the range of the trombone-the earliest use of an "E" pull!

Cheers

Stewbones
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ronnies
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« Reply #7 on: Mar 08, 2017, 02:36AM »

When I was at school (this was the 1970s) we had a G bass trombone in the cupboard.  It had a looped crook like those that could be put between the slide and the bell to put it into F. 

I tried to play it one day when I'd forgotten my own trombone but had great difficulty getting it in tune.  It seemed to be in Ab or Gb.  Was probably a high pitch instrument which of course I knew nothing about at the time. :-)

Ronnie
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