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Author Topic: Advice on Hitting High Notes?  (Read 15262 times)
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Pre59

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« Reply #80 on: Mar 21, 2017, 09:52AM »

Just a little light relief,

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sXJ8tKRlW3E
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Geezerhorn

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« Reply #81 on: Mar 21, 2017, 11:19AM »

Good!

I can't speak for anyone else, but part of my problem developing a "professional high range" is the amount of practice time I do every day. This past winter, I have been putting in a solid 4 hours a day; divided more-or-less equally into two sessions - morning and evening. While I am advancing on pretty much all fronts rapidly (under expert instruction!), I am fighting fatigue of high range. Otherwise, I am getting chops of steel and so I guess it's just a matter of time...

Notice I put the term "professional high range" in quotes. Anticipating some of the sharp-shooters calling me on it, I define a "professional high range" as full use of high D for an entry-level tenor pro and advancement on up as the pro seasons. I know there are a number of pros who can not play above high C. But that doesn't change how I view it. YMMV!

...Geezer

The POINT is that the OP - if he is an industrious student - might be in the same boat. He may be practicing his butt off and wondering why his range is - in his opinion - lagging. It's a dilemma I have often chaffed about; the amount of time needed on the horn for technical gains vs the amount of rest time the chops need to build back up. They seem to interfere with each other. I don't see piano players lamenting about sore fingers, hand and wrists - or do they?

...Geezer
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MrPillow
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« Reply #82 on: Mar 21, 2017, 11:23AM »

Many are the pianists who have been reduced to back, shoulder, neck, and carpal tunnel surgeries. The list goes on. Every instrument has some level of particular physical barrier.
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Piano man
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« Reply #83 on: Mar 21, 2017, 11:51AM »

Many are the pianists who have been reduced to back, shoulder, neck, and carpal tunnel surgeries. The list goes on. Every instrument has some level of particular physical barrier.

This is why doing it right is so important, and speaks to having proper instruction. A small physical error in one's playing, carried over years of repetition, can do real harm. I'm self-taught on piano (learned it by accident writing big band charts) and was lucky enough to stumble into a way of playing that doesn't hurt my body. It doesn't hurt that I play half as many notes as a good player.

My friend, who's much better than I, has all kinds of hand problems and calls me for two-keyboard gigs as his 'right-hand man' when things are acting up.

I played Holiday Inns for years with a guitar player who started having physical problems. Turned out to be the way he was standing. When you do six-nighters, that stuff matters. He's older than I am, and is very careful how he stands, and still plays.

I would suggest anyone who plays a lot of hours should have professional instruction, because no instrument is worth crippling yourself over.
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« Reply #84 on: Mar 21, 2017, 11:52AM »

I found that frequent but short rests do a lot more good (at least to me) than long rest after long periods of playing with no rest.
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« Reply #85 on: Mar 21, 2017, 11:54AM »

Perhaps a good discussion on playing high ought to involve how we condition our bodies in general as well as our minds.
...Geezer

The main conditioning for high range should be in the biceps. If your teeth aren't moving, you're not using enough pressure.
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« Reply #86 on: Mar 21, 2017, 12:13PM »

I heard a story in my home country (Bulgaria) about a trumpet student/bodybuilder who was so stressed during an exam that he grabbed the valves of his trumpet so hard, that he broke the valve casing....
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Geezerhorn

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« Reply #87 on: Mar 21, 2017, 01:02PM »

 Amazed   Amazed   Amazed   Amazed

Eye-opening responses!

I guess it's all mind-over-matter. If your chops don't mind, it doesn't matter.

...Geezer
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Pre59

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« Reply #88 on: Mar 21, 2017, 02:12PM »

The OP hasn't been back, so there you go.

They'll be a similar topic around soon, it keeps the forum alive..
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« Reply #89 on: Mar 21, 2017, 09:57PM »

The OP hasn't been back, so there you go.

They'll be a similar topic around soon, it keeps the forum alive..

Yeah, but how do you hit high notes?
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« Reply #90 on: Mar 21, 2017, 09:58PM »

Seriously, someone told me that playing falset tones improves high register, and I think it works. Not sure why.
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Doug Elliott
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« Reply #91 on: Mar 21, 2017, 11:05PM »

Have you tried helium?
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Pre59

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« Reply #92 on: Mar 22, 2017, 03:59AM »

Yeah, but how do you hit high notes?

Piano man, if you want to have a discourse on this, and by that I mean an exchange of Q and A's, I'm more than happy to share my personal view how I build and maintain my range.



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« Reply #93 on: Mar 22, 2017, 05:32AM »

Actually "Hit" is a very poor choice of a word for that.

Hitting and banging notes in the high register in a high adrenalin fashion is going hardly to do develop anything besides tendinits or lip/muscle injuries.

Low adrenalin soft playing of slurs and trills in a well controled fashion with as little effort as possible with frequent and short rest is likely to develop the high register on any brass instrument.
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« Reply #94 on: Mar 22, 2017, 11:35AM »

Piano man, if you want to have a discourse on this, and by that I mean an exchange of Q and A's, I'm more than happy to share my personal view how I build and maintain my range.

I was joking. I am a returning player (and barely that) and the one thing that wasn't a challenge for me after all those years was range. High range was actually easier for me right out of the gate than before I quit playing. Endurance, not so much. So now I'm a really lousy trombonist who can play high notes.

I was serious about false tones, though. Somebody told me that when I was in high school and it seems to help.
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Pre59

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« Reply #95 on: Mar 22, 2017, 12:40PM »

I was joking. I am a returning player (and barely that) and the one thing that wasn't a challenge for me after all those years was range. High range was actually easier for me right out of the gate than before I quit playing. Endurance, not so much. So now I'm a really lousy trombonist who can play high notes.

I was serious about false tones, though. Somebody told me that when I was in high school and it seems to help.

Fair enough. I guess focusing on mid range long tones etc is the way to go, but you may need to find a way to integrate your high range into the rest of your playing. For this, I use a form of lip flexibilities which are not so linear as the standard form. i.e. not going down the slide 1234567 etc. I break up the positions like, 1324357 or 14 25 36 with reverse directions, and flexing in different directions as well, which is musically more satisfying and useful.
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« Reply #96 on: Mar 22, 2017, 01:14PM »

Actually, I read about using falset tones in an exercise by the late Paul Tanner.  Sorry he's no longer here to defend himself but one of his students used to post messages from him on the Forum.
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« Reply #97 on: Mar 22, 2017, 01:21PM »

This isn't directed at anyone in particular, but pardon me if I remain a skeptic about developing high range without playing high. Is it like "The art of fighting without fighting" - Bruce Lee in "Enter The Dragon". lol

...Geezer
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« Reply #98 on: Mar 22, 2017, 01:33PM »

This isn't directed at anyone in particular, but pardon me if I remain a skeptic about developing high range without playing high. ...Geezer
My teacher, the late Lewis Van Haney, was the all about practicing in the registers, up and down, that you need to play in.  He insisted that that upper register was built on a combo of air support, and embrochure, and that the embrochure DID change somewhat is the registers of the notes went up and down.  He showed me, as did Phil Wilson, that  proper support would easily give you a high note, even with out loads of air.
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« Reply #99 on: Mar 22, 2017, 01:53PM »

My teacher, the late Lewis Van Haney, was the all about practicing in the registers, up and down, that you need to play in.  He insisted that that upper register was built on a combo of air support, and embrochure, and that the embrochure DID change somewhat is the registers of the notes went up and down.  He showed me, as did Phil Wilson, that  proper support would easily give you a high note, even with out loads of air.

Please define "proper support" b/c I am led to believe there are some here who erroneously feel there is no need for it.

...Geezer
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