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Author Topic: Basic Military Training  (Read 727 times)
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TromboneConcerto

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« on: Mar 16, 2017, 05:20AM »

Hi all,

A few month ago I won a job in my city's navy band. I just finished the lengthy application process, and my enrollment was last night. It was also the first day of my Unit-level basic training. I wasn't expecting basic to start right away, and it really tore me down emotionally.

Have any of you gone through basic? Do you have any tips you could share with me to help get me through this? I'm already feeling very scared and can't stop thinking about it.

Thanks in advance,
Kyle
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miabone
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« Reply #1 on: Mar 16, 2017, 06:37AM »

The best advice I can give you is not to lose perspective.  Basic will eventually end. It is easy to get caught up in it and lose your perspective. During my basic training I had to keep reminding myself that it would eventually be over and my normal life would resume.

Also remember that your drill sergeants DONT actually hate you, it only seems that way.  They are just doing their job, and it is a tough job.  They spend incredibly long hours for pretty low pay trying to turn civilians into military personnel in a very short amount of time. The easiest way to do this is by yelling  Evil a lot
The name of the game is controlled stress. Just do your best, but realize that they will keep pushing because it is their job to do so.
Being concerned and a little scared is normal. This is a big change for everyone. You are going to have funny stories for your friends after it is all done, but they wont seem funny while they are happening.

Last and certainly not least: THINK LESS. Basic (at least U.S.army basic) is set up where you can get away with only saying yes or no for ten weeks.  Go with the flow.  A lot of it wont make sense but dont worry, go with it.
Good luck man. Go for the middle and you'll be fine.

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« Reply #2 on: Mar 16, 2017, 06:44AM »

The best advice I can give you is not to lose perspective.  Basic will eventually end. It is easy to get caught up in it and lose your perspective. During my basic training I had to keep reminding myself that it would eventually be over and my normal life would resume.

Also remember that your drill sergeants DONT actually hate you, it only seems that way.  They are just doing their job, and it is a tough job.  They spend incredibly long hours for pretty low pay trying to turn civilians into military personnel in a very short amount of time. The easiest way to do this is by yelling  Evil a lot
The name of the game is controlled stress. Just do your best, but realize that they will keep pushing because it is their job to do so.
Being concerned and a little scared is normal. This is a big change for everyone. You are going to have funny stories for your friends after it is all done, but they wont seem funny while they are happening.

Last and certainly not least: THINK LESS. Basic (at least U.S.army basic) is set up where you can get away with only saying yes or no for ten weeks.  Go with the flow.  A lot of it wont make sense but dont worry, go with it.
Good luck man. Go for the middle and you'll be fine.


Yep. Do what they tell you to do when they tell you to do it and do it with enthusiasm, but don't single yourself out.

Be wary of "deals" they might want to make with you for extending your service time. Those same "deals" can be struck at home after the pressure of basic training is over. I was in the National Guard and they tried repeatedly to offer me sweet incentives to transfer over to regular army. I thanked them respectfully for their offers and kept my head down. When I got home, I gave it more thought.

...Geezer
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« Reply #3 on: Mar 16, 2017, 07:25AM »

Is unit level basic training just prep stuff in your city getting you ready for actual basic training? If so ... you may be in for a surprise when you enlist and get shipped off to actual combat training. If you have computer or phone access at actual basic training, I'd be very surprised.
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« Reply #4 on: Mar 16, 2017, 09:10AM »

I remember when my best friend called me up after his Army basic was through.  First words were like Man, this is the stupidest thing I've ever done.  He ended up staying 7-8 years, non musician, a map maker and some other job/war veteran. 

  My brother in-law was a helicopter mechanic in the service and I worked with one war veteran who wanted to re-up when a reward for Gaddafi was made public.  And he just turned 25. 

I know of one Navy veteran who did his 20 years or so and retired before he was 40.  I believe his toughest job these days may be deciding which avenue he wants to traverse when driving his new Ford Mustang.   Just go for it and realize becoming a military brass player may be tough learning too.
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Geezerhorn

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« Reply #5 on: Mar 16, 2017, 09:19AM »

Man, I really liked weapons training. I mean, like REALLY! What a treat that was; throwing a grenade, firing a bazooka, sniping with a 50-cal machine gun, launching mortar rounds, etc...

...Geezer
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« Reply #6 on: Mar 16, 2017, 09:26AM »

I remember my sister called me before Marine qualifying about M-16 sighting.  She did real well though she never mentioned becoming a sniper to me afterwards.  Glad she's a mother these days.
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« Reply #7 on: Mar 16, 2017, 09:47AM »

I remember my sister called me before Marine qualifying about M-16 sighting.  She did real well though she never mentioned becoming a sniper to me afterwards.  Glad she's a mother these days.

She probably didn't mention becoming a sniper because it has been only about a year since females have been eligible to become snipers in the US military. To the best of my knowledge,  there are as yet no female snipers in the US Military.
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« Reply #8 on: Mar 16, 2017, 09:53AM »

She probably didn't mention becoming a sniper because it has been only about a year since females have been eligible to become snipers in the US military. To the best of my knowledge,  there are as yet no female snipers in the US Military.

Doesn't mean she couldn't have qualified as one (even if never deployed).  I've known some really sharp-eyed females.  We used to hire them as product inspectors.
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« Reply #9 on: Mar 16, 2017, 10:24AM »

Doesn't mean she couldn't have qualified as one (even if never deployed).  I've known some really sharp-eyed females.  We used to hire them as product inspectors.

Sniper is an infantry MOS position that requires additional schooling and training on top of infantry schooling -- until recently you could not be a female infantryman. Expert Rifleman, Sharpshooter, and Marksman are qualifications. Maybe she said Sharpshooter  :)
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« Reply #10 on: Mar 16, 2017, 10:43AM »

I just saw that the OP is in Canada. Haha, my bad.

I don't know jack about basic training in canada.
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« Reply #11 on: Mar 16, 2017, 11:11AM »

She said Marksman at first then Expert when she left - not a sniper.  I did not notice Canadian by the o.p. either, oops.
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« Reply #12 on: Mar 16, 2017, 11:18AM »

I'll bet there are some things in the Canadian military that are the same as America.  The stress, the intimidation, the constant pushing.

Kyle, keep your chin up and remember that it will all be over soon enough.

Do you have to do a Military School of Music like we do in the US?
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Bruce Guttman
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« Reply #13 on: Mar 16, 2017, 12:37PM »

I remember a theory that military band members shot well, because they released the shot like they released a note.  Others who made the trigger pull more of a positive action had less success.

I dunno. 
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Tim Richardson
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« Reply #14 on: Mar 16, 2017, 01:31PM »

No matter whether it's Canada or the U.S., the important thing to remember is that this is training, and they want you to do well.  Don't be resistant or try to out-think your instructors.  Do it their way without question.  Military training is tough but it's temporary.  Bandsmen are a little more "on the ball" than most other military occupations.  You'll do fine.

This was almost 20 years ago!  I usually shot 40 out of 40 and was always proud of this.  Bandsmen frequently out-shot the infantry and artillery, and I was invited to join the state marksmanship unit (competitive shooters).  Not my thing, so I declined.

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« Reply #15 on: Mar 16, 2017, 02:28PM »

I remember a theory that military band members shot well, because they released the shot like they released a note.  Others who made the trigger pull more of a positive action had less success.

I dunno. 

If anything I'd say it's:

1) We tend to be better at listening to direction and following instruction.
2) Breath control.
3) Experience repeating the SAME thing over and over.  Putting shot after shot in the same place requires the same kind of consistency as performing music.
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« Reply #16 on: Mar 16, 2017, 03:12PM »

No matter whether it's Canada or the U.S., the important thing to remember is that this is training, and they want you to do well.  Don't be resistant or try to out-think your instructors.  Do it their way without question.  Military training is tough but it's temporary.  Bandsmen are a little more "on the ball" than most other military occupations.  You'll do fine.

This was almost 20 years ago!  I usually shot 40 out of 40 and was always proud of this.  Bandsmen frequently out-shot the infantry and artillery, and I was invited to join the state marksmanship unit (competitive shooters).  Not my thing, so I declined.



I got 38 out of 40 once at ROTC camp in 1981. I always shot expert except for one time when the battalion commander picked my platoon (I was the platoon leader) for some sort of spot inspection. We had to go out and qualify and there was snow on the ground and I couldn't hardly see the target. I didn't even qualify that day, which was embarrassing to say the least.
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TromboneConcerto

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« Reply #17 on: Mar 17, 2017, 08:44AM »

Thank you all for your responses. After reading through these replies and talking with a few people who had already been through it, I feel a lot better.

Do you have to do a Military School of Music like we do in the US?

Yes, we do! I will be going there after my basic is finished.

Is unit level basic training just prep stuff in your city getting you ready for actual basic training? If so ... you may be in for a surprise when you enlist and get shipped off to actual combat training. If you have computer or phone access at actual basic training, I'd be very surprised.

The system in Canada just changed this year, and now (for the navy) it is split into three modules. The first is done at the unit, which is pretty much standard basic but weekly instead of daily. The second module is the hardcore residential training (it's in Quebec) and then the third module is back at the unit, just polishing everything up and concluding the training.
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« Reply #18 on: Mar 17, 2017, 09:47AM »

That sounds a lot more humane.  You have a week to recover from each insult at the beginning.  Maybe by the time you do the residence you won't be as flummoxed.

I forgot to congratulate you on winning the Navy Band audition. Good!
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Bruce Guttman
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« Reply #19 on: Mar 17, 2017, 11:38AM »

That sounds a lot more humane. 

I  didn't find USMC recruit training to be inhumane at all.   Clever
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