Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length

 
Advanced search

1081030 Posts in 71558 Topics- by 19065 Members - Latest Member: edgar uitzeeland
Jump to:  
Pages: 1 [2]  All   Go Down
Print
Author Topic: The Trombonist's Time Machine  (Read 3231 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Matt K

*
*
Offline Offline

Location:
Joined: May 6, 2010
Posts: 7043

View Profile
« Reply #20 on: May 05, 2017, 07:56AM »

Honestly... as much as I like trombone, I would love to hear Bach play live.  If he could only know how much hundreds of years after his death his influence is still so widely known.
Logged

What's in a name? that which we call a tenor-bass posaune
By any other name would smell as sweet;
robcat2075

*
Offline Offline

Location: Dallas, Texas
Joined: Apr 19, 2009
Posts: 5937

View Profile
« Reply #21 on: May 05, 2017, 09:19AM »

Honestly... as much as I like trombone, I would love to hear Bach play live.  If he could only know how much hundreds of years after his death his influence is still so widely known.

That would be interesting. There are a lot of "improvisors" in the old times that we only have a notion of what that was all about.

Beethoven could improvise a whole piano sonata.

Bruckner went to an examination to try to get into a school and by the time he was done demonstrating his organ improvising they wanted him to take the job teaching instead.  :D

They were doing a whole lot more than doodling over a repeating chord pattern, they were doing extended form.
Logged

Robert Holmén

Hear me as I Play My Horn


Get your Popper, Dotzauer, or Kummer play-alongs!
robcat2075

*
Offline Offline

Location: Dallas, Texas
Joined: Apr 19, 2009
Posts: 5937

View Profile
« Reply #22 on: May 05, 2017, 09:22AM »

Another thing I'd be curious to hear first hand is ancient music of the Greeks and Romans.

Said to be enormously affecting and powerful on the audience but we have very few clues about it.
Logged

Robert Holmén

Hear me as I Play My Horn


Get your Popper, Dotzauer, or Kummer play-alongs!
uncle duke
*
Offline Offline

Location:
Joined: Jan 15, 2017
Posts: 105

View Profile
« Reply #23 on: May 05, 2017, 09:46AM »

After some thought I have two choices for my top pick and a third but a week from now these could change mostly because of off the cuff thinking this morning.

1.  The early 1800's time period of Mendelssohn and David.  How could one compose one of the greatest pieces of music and leave earth so early in life?  And of course there's the David composed for trombone usage.  They grew up together.

2.  My other top pick would be the time period of the late 1500's when Maggini was under Da Salo's wing learning to make the violin as we know it today.  Reasons for not deciding on one top choice would be I wouldn't want to be in Hamburg as it was then and the other reason would be the unknown/untreatable diseases of the 1500-1600's.

3.  The time period of Vivaldi, Corelli and Bach.  Harpischord and piano were in their infancy then too, I think.   
Logged
harrison.t.reed
*
Offline Offline

Location: Colorado
Joined: Apr 5, 2007
Posts: 2576
"Spartan Brass Band!"


View Profile
« Reply #24 on: May 05, 2017, 10:41AM »

Another thing I'd be curious to hear first hand is ancient music of the Greeks and Romans.

Said to be enormously affecting and powerful on the audience but we have very few clues about it.

It sounded like this:

<a href="https://youtube.com/v/vxlste3JucU" target="_blank">https://youtube.com/v/vxlste3JucU</a>
Logged

"My technique is as good as Initial D"
T-396A - Griego 1C
88HTCL - Griego 1C
36H - DE XT105, C+, D Alto Shank
3B/F Silversonic - Griego 1A ss
pBone (with Yellow bell for bright tone)
Pages: 1 [2]  All   Go Up
Print
Jump to: