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The Trombone ForumHorns, Gear, and EquipmentMouthpieces(Moderators: BGuttman, Doug Elliott) Good MP for switching between bass and tenor
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bassclef

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« Reply #20 on: Apr 18, 2017, 12:14PM »

I double on bass, .547, .525 and .508 instruments and use a different mouthpiece for each. What I've personally found success with is using mouthpieces that have rims with a similar contour and bite. Although they are all different sizes, appropriate for the individual horn, I find that having the rim similarities described above makes for easier transitions because they all interact with my facial tissue in the same way.

Maybe this is all in my head, but it definitely works for me.
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Aaron Thornberry
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« Reply #21 on: Apr 18, 2017, 12:25PM »

I find that similar profiles (not necessarily sizes) help, but not necessarily same cup designs and volumes. In other words, similar shaped rims often reduce time to get used to and facilitate the switch. This is not a necessity, but it is helpful. You can get used to different styles of rims, but the risk of inconsistent playing is bigger, especially if you switch instruments during the same gig.

My spelling gets so weird when I try to type something on my tablet :-) But you get the message :-)
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Le.Tromboniste
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« Reply #22 on: Apr 18, 2017, 01:00PM »

I find that similar profiles (not necessarily sizes) help, but not necessarily same cup designs and volumes. In other words, similar shaped rims often redice time to get used to and facilitate the switch. This is not a necessity, but it is helpful. You can used to different styles of rims, but the risk of inconsistent playing is bigger, especially if you switch instruments during the same gig.

Yes! This!
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Maximilien Brisson
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« Reply #23 on: Apr 18, 2017, 09:18PM »

The right mouthpiece for switching is actually three things...

1) the right mouthpiece for you and your tenor

2) the right mouthpiece for you and your bass

3) enough practice on both to get the doubling chops needed to, well, double
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« Reply #24 on: May 12, 2017, 09:38AM »

Go with what works and Practice ,Practice, Practice
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« Reply #25 on: May 12, 2017, 02:13PM »

The right mouthpiece for switching is actually three things...

1) the right mouthpiece for you and your tenor

2) the right mouthpiece for you and your bass

3) enough practice on both to get the doubling chops needed to, well, double

Absolutely. Works for any doubling pair.
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FlamingRain
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« Reply #26 on: May 16, 2017, 08:52PM »

I don't really understand this question whenever it pops up. Why not use the bass mouthpiece you sound best with on bass, and your favorite tenor mouthpiece on tenor? Why compromise? Find what sounds and plays best on each, make sure you have a distinct sound concept in mind,  and your chops will adapt to whatever you put on your face.

Also, you might find that an extremely deep cupped but tenor-rimmed mouthpiece works great on bass for earlier or lighter rep that needs a lighter bass sound and doesn't go low.

This approach works for some, and it definitely was OK for me when I was in high school. I now use Doug's approach of 'same rim' at least for my small bore big band and large bore and alto. The 106 rim I play on is fairly large, bordering on small bass rim size, with the cup matching the instrument. I would never have used this approach if I were younger or if Doug hadn't had me try it and it works for me. The one time I had to play bass I played on a fairly large rim, and it didn't bother me terribly.
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Sascha Burckhardt

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« Reply #27 on: Jun 01, 2017, 05:56AM »

I don't really understand this question whenever it pops up. Why not use the bass mouthpiece you sound best with on bass, and your favorite tenor mouthpiece on tenor? Why compromise? Find what sounds and plays best on each, make sure you have a distinct sound concept in mind,  and your chops will adapt to whatever you put on your face.

Also, you might find that an extremely deep cupped but tenor-rimmed mouthpiece works great on bass for earlier or lighter rep that needs a lighter bass sound and doesn't go low.
I've found this is what works for me as well.   
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« Reply #28 on: Jun 02, 2017, 01:54AM »

I have gone through different modes when trying to find shortcuts, so have many of my friend and students.
I have even played the tuba with a basstrombone rim, tenor with a basstrombone rim. Lots of younger players tried the same rim on bass and tenor, it does work up to a point. No, it is not a common way if you like to play bass and tenor seriously. Sometimes you can get by playing basstrombone parts on a Bach 42 with a 4G mouthpiece. And maybe you can do that good. Even playing basstrombone parts on a King 2B is possble in emergency situations.
Many players use the same rim for small and large tenor and alto, that can be done with big succses.

Playing tenor and bass with the same rim is something many players tried.

Very few players continou doing that, almost non do that more than it takes to find that it does not really work for them.

But, if you like to use the tenor as your main instrument and do a little basstrombone playing, not so serious, you can use the same rim anyway, but you probably not get a good advise for mpc like that on this forum.
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