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Author Topic: Similar to Bordogni  (Read 1806 times)
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savio

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« on: Apr 22, 2017, 10:28AM »

Is there any other book that is similar to the Bordogni melodies out there? Marco Bordogni died in 1856. Is there other melodic etudes written in more modern time that is also melodic like the Bordogni etudes?

Leif
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« Reply #1 on: Apr 22, 2017, 10:47AM »

I like to play the Telemann Flute Fantasies. Lot's of melodic fun on Trombone :-)
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« Reply #2 on: Apr 22, 2017, 11:16AM »

If you want something in a more modern idiom, the Tommy Pederson books are very good.

Singers are still  using Bordogni, though.
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« Reply #3 on: Apr 22, 2017, 12:14PM »

Pichareau 30 recreative studies and Busser Etudes Melodiques are really nice options.
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« Reply #4 on: Apr 22, 2017, 12:46PM »

I like Cimera as well, which are sort of Bordogni lite. Shorter (3-4 lines). I like to do a series of them in different octaves and clefs.

There's a nice set of melodious etudes for tuba by Rys.
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« Reply #5 on: Apr 22, 2017, 01:10PM »

I prefer Seiber, Concone, and Marchesi to Bordogni.

Especially the 8-measure studies by Seiber.

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« Reply #6 on: Apr 22, 2017, 01:34PM »

I will second the vocalises of Mathilde Marchesi.

Similar to Bordogni but shorter and more interesting.

The set of 12 in Op. 13 is a good set.
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« Reply #7 on: Apr 22, 2017, 04:34PM »

Some of my favourite lyrical etudes are in the Grigoriev Etudes. Gorgeous writing.

Andrew
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« Reply #8 on: Apr 22, 2017, 09:30PM »

Snedecor Lyric Etudes
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Kris Danielsen
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« Reply #9 on: Apr 23, 2017, 06:58AM »

Tommy Pederson is out of print (or was when I was in college) but you can get it through inter-library loan from a few university libraries.

They are more diverse in style and not all lyrical/legato, but they are fantastic.

Some of Blazhevich's clef studies are very lyrical as well.
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« Reply #10 on: Apr 23, 2017, 07:01AM »

I guess that Concone Vocalises can be used as well, but they are hardly any more modern than Bordogni's...
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savio

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« Reply #11 on: Apr 23, 2017, 10:34PM »

Hmmm....so there is a lot to try out! Thanks!

Leif
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« Reply #12 on: May 02, 2017, 01:53PM »

Bordogni's own duet etudes, a book of twelve of them, are difficult and high, but fun.  Both parts also make musical sense played alone or played with Bordogni's piano accompaniments.
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« Reply #13 on: May 03, 2017, 08:42AM »

Suzuki Cello Books are MY jam!
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« Reply #14 on: May 11, 2017, 10:47PM »

Or for something off the beaten path you could try, "24 Italian songs and arias," for medium high or medium low voice.

Marco Bordogni's students would have sung many of these songs and arias. Thus, his vocalises prepared them and you, indirectly, to sing/play them. If you read treble clef, play it down an octave (as a male singer would). If you read Bb transposing treble clef, play it that way, or read as tenor clef and add two flats (or take away two #s). I suppose you could transcribe it to bass clef.

There are various benefits including:
1) It's cheap: online, yard sale, maybe even free...
2) Most pianists have played most, if not all of these and the piano part is included right on the page. So, you can find an accompanist readily (provided you play written notes/key).
3) Besides the benefits to classical playing, you are developing skills for reading off of a lead sheet/song chart.
4) You can listen to numerous singers performing them (especially tenors and baritones) for reference.
5) Probably the most significant benefits are developing a legato, singing-style, of playing and being able to see the phrasing, since you can follow the text.

So, when you go back to the "Melodius Etudes" you can see why Rochut and later editors chose these exercises. You will begin to see the "vocal" phrasing in them and other lyrical etudes and pieces.

For a  beautiful solo in this singing-style, try "Vocalise" by Sergei Rachmaninoff. Originally for voice, there are numerous transcriptions for different instruments. But I'm partial to the one for trombone by Keith Brown.

A vocalise is literally a song, or exercise, with no words.
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« Reply #15 on: May 12, 2017, 05:17AM »

These aren't any more modern, dating to 1859.

But I've been using the Arban's Art of Phrasing section.  There are 150 very short lyrical tunes, obviously vocal melodies taken from popular songs of the day.  I hardly recognize any of them so it is also an exercise in sightreading, something I don't do enough of.  They were public domain on IMSLP.  They are treble clef of course.  I play them as written for a range exercise, and then in tenor, alto, and mezzo clef as clef exercises.  Clef exercises on the alto pBone really make my brain hurt, which is probably a good thing. 
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« Reply #16 on: May 12, 2017, 06:16AM »

These aren't any more modern, dating to 1859.

But I've been using the Arban's Art of Phrasing section.  There are 150 very short lyrical tunes, obviously vocal melodies taken from popular songs of the day.  I hardly recognize any of them so it is also an exercise in sightreading, something I don't do enough of.  They were public domain on IMSLP.  They are treble clef of course.  I play them as written for a range exercise, and then in tenor, alto, and mezzo clef as clef exercises.  Clef exercises on the alto pBone really make my brain hurt, which is probably a good thing. 
Another excellent suggestion.
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savio

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« Reply #17 on: May 12, 2017, 06:59AM »

Or for something off the beaten path you could try, "24 Italian songs and arias," for medium high or medium low voice.

Marco Bordogni's students would have sung many of these songs and arias. Thus, his vocalises prepared them and you, indirectly, to sing/play them. If you read treble clef, play it down an octave (as a male singer would). If you read Bb transposing treble clef, play it that way, or read as tenor clef and add two flats (or take away two #s). I suppose you could transcribe it to bass clef.

There are various benefits including:
1) It's cheap: online, yard sale, maybe even free...
2) Most pianists have played most, if not all of these and the piano part is included right on the page. So, you can find an accompanist readily (provided you play written notes/key).
3) Besides the benefits to classical playing, you are developing skills for reading off of a lead sheet/song chart.
4) You can listen to numerous singers performing them (especially tenors and baritones) for reference.
5) Probably the most significant benefits are developing a legato, singing-style, of playing and being able to see the phrasing, since you can follow the text.

So, when you go back to the "Melodius Etudes" you can see why Rochut and later editors chose these exercises. You will begin to see the "vocal" phrasing in them and other lyrical etudes and pieces.

For a  beautiful solo in this singing-style, try "Vocalise" by Sergei Rachmaninoff. Originally for voice, there are numerous transcriptions for different instruments. But I'm partial to the one for trombone by Keith Brown.

A vocalise is literally a song, or exercise, with no words.


I got them! Very nice, thanks! And i have the big Arban cornet method, never used it much. Anyway so many good suggestions here. Didn't know there is so much out there :)

Leif

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« Reply #18 on: May 12, 2017, 08:04AM »

How about trying Pierre Rode 15 Caprices edited by Keith Brown for bass trombone or tenor trombone with f attachment. Rode was a concert violinist and composer having composed a number of violin concerti. The 15 Caprices were originally for violin and there was 24 of them. Mendelssohn was a protege of Rode. These are very difficult due to range, clef changes, and technical demands particularly the bass trombone.

Regarding Rochut....Larry Campbell had me transpose them to tenor clef and play down the octave. John Mead have me play them in remote keys
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« Reply #19 on: Jun 23, 2017, 06:26AM »

I second the CIMERA etudes. Short, compact, beautifully written, easy to play in different keys and great to include in your daily fundamentals session.:-)
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