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The Trombone ForumHorns, Gear, and EquipmentAccessories(Moderator: slide advantage) Leather hand grips - are they really worth it?
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crazytrombonist505
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« on: Apr 24, 2017, 11:15AM »

Hello everyone,
For awhile now I've been contemplating maybe trying to buy some leather hand grips for my tenor trombone and maybe my bass. I notice that while I am playing (weather I'm nervous about it or not) My hands tend to sweat a lot. I'm wondering if that could be potentially harmful to my trombones? I'm willing to make the investment if they will protect my horns from damage.
What do you guys think?

Thanks in advance!

Zach
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BGuttman
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« Reply #1 on: Apr 24, 2017, 11:25AM »

Some people have very acidic sweat and others don't.  If you are already eating through the lacquer then a leather guard may be a good idea.  I know of people who have actually eaten through the metal on the cork barrels (I'm not one of them, thank heavens).

The nice thing about a leather guard is you can take it off if you don't like it, so if you think you need one you could certainly try.
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Bruce Guttman
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LeoInFL
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« Reply #2 on: Apr 24, 2017, 11:57AM »

I used one leather guard on my large bore tenor, more for comfort than to protect the horn's finish. I use a non-conventional left hand grip (slide brace between my middle and ring fingers) and the guard gives me a little padding for my fingers.
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« Reply #3 on: Apr 24, 2017, 03:02PM »

Problem with leather guards, (even the plastic lined ones) is they absorb the moisture (sweat) and hold it on the instrument. You play merrily away for years (sometimes) thinking, "My horns fine, I have guards". Meanwhile, the sweat is eating it's way into your horn.

So, either don't use them, and wipe the horn down every time you play, or use them, and run the risk of the horn pitting under the guard...

M
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Ellrod

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« Reply #4 on: Apr 24, 2017, 03:10PM »

I've got a couple sets, free to whoever wants them. Came off Shires .547 and Conn 88H slides.
« Last Edit: Apr 25, 2017, 07:59AM by Ellrod » Logged
crazytrombonist505
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« Reply #5 on: Apr 25, 2017, 06:30AM »

I've got a couple sets, free to whoever wants them.

PM sent!
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crazytrombonist505
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« Reply #6 on: Apr 25, 2017, 06:31AM »

Thanks for all the great replies so far! Really appreciated!
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Le.Tromboniste
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« Reply #7 on: Apr 25, 2017, 07:35AM »

I used leather grips for one or both hands as well as a neck guard for years, didn't ever have any problem with them absorbing sweat, and when they did a little bit, it would not go through the layer of anti-moisture mesh between the leather and velvet.

However, I would not recommend using anything that doesn't have that layer of mesh in the middle. A friend of mine had leather grips that somebody had made for him, without any extra lining. We took them off at some point at a rehearsal break only to discover a very thick, crusty layer of dark verdigris...
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Maximilien Brisson
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« Reply #8 on: Apr 25, 2017, 07:45AM »

Problem with leather guards, (even the plastic lined ones) is they absorb the moisture (sweat) and hold it on the instrument. You play merrily away for years (sometimes) thinking, "My horns fine, I have guards". Meanwhile, the sweat is eating it's way into your horn.

So, either don't use them, and wipe the horn down every time you play, or use them, and run the risk of the horn pitting under the guard...

M
SO TRUE.
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« Reply #9 on: Apr 25, 2017, 07:58AM »

My system is (at times) very acidic. I`ve taken all the lacquer off a hand grip of a Bach 16M in one 3 hour gig.
Some times they are needed
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« Reply #10 on: Apr 25, 2017, 08:04AM »

Don't forget the contact point with the neck for some people/bones. Conn sell clear plastic tubes that can be cut to size for neck protection. I did four horns from one pack, even if one tube is for a handslide. Could not find suitable clear pipe in hardware store.
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« Reply #11 on: Apr 25, 2017, 08:11AM »

I've used leather specialties guards on my horns for over 20 years.  My sweat isn't very acidic and I don't play in too many extreme environments. I taken them off occasionally and I have no nasty verdigris or any real buildup. A little dirt, but nothing too bad.  So, it really does vary.  I gave up on the right hand grip almost immediately. I don't like that much at all.  I like a left hand grip to make the horn a little softer to hold.  Feels nice.  I like the neckguard for the pencil holder.  Never seems to cover enough to stop me from getting green stuff on my collar from my unlacquered horns.  If they disappeared tomorrow, it wouldn't bug me that much, but I do prefer to have that left hand one.  I haven't bothered to pick up one for my latest horn, and that has been almost 5 years now, so that tells you how much I prioritize these.

Worth it? For minimal investment, I've gotten my money's worth. Necessary? Naw,  but nice enough.

Cheers,
Andy
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« Reply #12 on: Apr 25, 2017, 08:33AM »

I played an 88h for 35 years, and eventually had to have the braces and cork barrels replaced because of pitting. My sweat isn't acidic, but there's a lot of it, especially since I used this horn under the lights performing a lot. So the new pieces got leather guards. I also use leather guards because some horns leave my hands black. This is especially true with older horns where the lacquer is worn off and you're touching raw nickel or nickel silver.
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« Reply #13 on: Apr 25, 2017, 09:13AM »

Don't forget the contact point with the neck for some people/bones. Conn sell clear plastic tubes that can be cut to size for neck protection. I did four horns from one pack, even if one tube is for a handslide. Could not find suitable clear pile in hardware store.

I definitely have to use this protection from neck.  I was losing lacquer.  My hand points seem to remain ok.  (Now it occurs to me one of the trombones I play doesn't have a neck guard.  I'll need to see how it's holding up.)
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« Reply #14 on: Apr 25, 2017, 04:59PM »

I don't want to diverge the topic too much, but I heard of someone putting acetone on the cork barrels of a silver Bach 16 and it came out with a very grippy texture. Anyone know something about this?
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« Reply #15 on: Apr 25, 2017, 07:40PM »

I don't want to diverge the topic too much, but I heard of someone putting acetone on the cork barrels of a silver Bach 16 and it came out with a very grippy texture. Anyone know something about this?

Acetone will either remove or attack the lacquer.  If it attacks the lacquer, it will create a very rough surface.  Sometimes wiping acetone on and letting it evaporate will result in a reticulated lacquer (think of the surface of a dry mud flat).  Lots of cracks and crevices to create the "grippy" surface.
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« Reply #16 on: Apr 25, 2017, 08:55PM »

Acetone will either remove or attack the lacquer.  If it attacks the lacquer, it will create a very rough surface.  Sometimes wiping acetone on and letting it evaporate will result in a reticulated lacquer (think of the surface of a dry mud flat).  Lots of cracks and crevices to create the "grippy" surface.

It's much like the second scenario you described. The horn was silver plated though, does Bach lacquer over their silver plate?
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Hard to tell until you blast it with a torch.
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« Reply #17 on: May 25, 2017, 06:50PM »

I've used leather specialties guards on my horns for over 20 years.  My sweat isn't very acidic and I don't play in too many extreme environments. I taken them off occasionally and I have no nasty verdigris or any real buildup. A little dirt, but nothing too bad.  So, it really does vary.  I gave up on the right hand grip almost immediately. I don't like that much at all.  I like a left hand grip to make the horn a little softer to hold.  Feels nice.  I like the neckguard for the pencil holder.  Never seems to cover enough to stop me from getting green stuff on my collar from my unlacquered horns.  If they disappeared tomorrow, it wouldn't bug me that much, but I do prefer to have that left hand one.  I haven't bothered to pick up one for my latest horn, and that has been almost 5 years now, so that tells you how much I prioritize these.

Worth it? For minimal investment, I've gotten my money's worth. Necessary? Naw,  but nice enough.

Cheers,
Andy

My experience is the same. My system is not acidic, so I don't have a problem with gunk building up under the leather. My 34B is hard to hold, and the leather grip keeps it from sliding off my palm. Avoids the need for a Bullet Brace or the equivalent.

Jerry Walker
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« Reply #18 on: Jun 02, 2017, 06:31PM »

I use black Wilson tennis racquet grip tape -- the one with the adhesive strip on the back. I purchase it from Wal-Mart and I use it on all of my trombone. It's inexpensive (less than $3), very comfortable, provides a great grip, and looks like leather from a distance. Also, I can wrap two slides with one pack. https://www.walmart.com/ip/Wilson-Sporting-Goods-Cushion-Pro-Replacement-Racket-Grip-Black/20703334#about-item
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« Reply #19 on: Jun 06, 2017, 08:59PM »

 Pant Pant Pant Pant Pant Pant Pant Pant Pant

I use black Wilson tennis racquet grip tape -- the one with the adhesive strip on the back. I purchase it from Wal-Mart and I use it on all of my trombone. It's inexpensive (less than $3), very comfortable, provides a great grip, and looks like leather from a distance. Also, I can wrap two slides with one pack. https://www.walmart.com/ip/Wilson-Sporting-Goods-Cushion-Pro-Replacement-Racket-Grip-Black/20703334#about-item
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« Reply #20 on: Jun 07, 2017, 06:39AM »

I use the leather specialty grips on all my horns. They really work well!
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« Reply #21 on: Jun 07, 2017, 06:44AM »

I have them on one horn and I think they make it look bad-ass. So yes, it's worth it!

...Geezer
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