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The Trombone ForumCreation and PerformanceThe Healthy Trombonist(Moderator: tbone62) Health care workers who don't look it
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timothy42b
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« on: May 16, 2017, 11:26AM »

I ended up in an urgent care center this week.  My wife fell and was injured on her job, so we went where they sent us.

I don't think I've been in one before.  Either I have a minor problem and schedule a visit with my doctor, or something major requires an emergency room visit.

The care was not that great - quick diagnosis with almost no exam, prescription for light duty with no time off (she couldn't even stand without assistance.)  Nor was it quick, we were there several hours.  I can see why, though; medical care beyond first aid moves an injury into the "OSHA Recordable" class and goes against a corporation's TIR, as does a lost time injury.  She didn't go into work today despite the doctor's order for light duty, so she'll get a "point" for absence, and enough of them cause you to be fired. 

One of the things I noticed about the center, which was slow despite not seeming to be busy, was the lack of fitness of the employees.  I don't like to criticize somebody's weight, but of the maybe 10 staff we saw, 9 were morbidly obese. 

I've worked in health care myself, years ago in a state hospital, and I wouldn't say many of us looked like fitness trainers, but neither were we that heavy as a group.

Is this a new trend?  Or an old one I've just been oblivious to? 
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Tim Richardson
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« Reply #1 on: May 16, 2017, 12:22PM »

I've dimly suspected that the speed with which they see you is related to how much money they can make off you.

My boyfriend had only to walk into an ER and say, "I'm a kidney and pancreas transplant patient and..." before they practically yanked him over the receptionist's desk and instantly found a bed for him. There's no end of tests they can run and bill someone for when you're a transplant patient.

But it sounds like your clinic's goal was to minimize the diagnosis to limit cost to the employer, maybe even to get you to leave without being seen by making you wait. Sounds like a conflict of interest to me.

I sense that "urgent care" clinics are rather low rungs on the medical career ladder, staffed by people who haven't excelled anywhere else.
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« Reply #2 on: May 16, 2017, 12:37PM »

The magic words in ER or Emergency Care are "chest pain".  Especially if you are a known heart patient.

I've sat for hours in an emergency room with any other ailment.  I wonder if they simply try to forget you are there. :(
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Bruce Guttman
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« Reply #3 on: May 16, 2017, 01:25PM »

Five years ago, I sat in agony for four hours while ambulance patients were whisked right in. I subsequently had emergency gall bladder surgery.

About a year ago, I passed out from 1/2 an initial dose of a prescribed pain killer after oral surgery. When I came too, bloodied - I asked my wife to call an ambulance. After a short ride, I went right straight in and got 7 stitches in my face. Since we subscribe to an ambulance service and (almost) never use it, it didn't cost us one dime.

I learned the moral of the story; don't walk when you can ride. Or maybe a new meme; Bae's ride beats your walk.

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SilverBone
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« Reply #4 on: May 16, 2017, 03:35PM »

The magic words in ER or Emergency Care are "chest pain".  Especially if you are a known heart patient.

I've sat for hours in an emergency room with any other ailment.  I wonder if they simply try to forget you are there. :(

+2 (at least)
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« Reply #5 on: May 16, 2017, 05:08PM »

I ended up in an urgent care center this week.  My wife fell and was injured on her job, so we went where they sent us.

I don't think I've been in one before.  Either I have a minor problem and schedule a visit with my doctor, or something major requires an emergency room visit.

The care was not that great - quick diagnosis with almost no exam, prescription for light duty with no time off (she couldn't even stand without assistance.)  Nor was it quick, we were there several hours.  I can see why, though; medical care beyond first aid moves an injury into the "OSHA Recordable" class and goes against a corporation's TIR, as does a lost time injury.  She didn't go into work today despite the doctor's order for light duty, so she'll get a "point" for absence, and enough of them cause you to be fired. 

One of the things I noticed about the center, which was slow despite not seeming to be busy, was the lack of fitness of the employees.  I don't like to criticize somebody's weight, but of the maybe 10 staff we saw, 9 were morbidly obese. 

I've worked in health care myself, years ago in a state hospital, and I wouldn't say many of us looked like fitness trainers, but neither were we that heavy as a group.

Is this a new trend?  Or an old one I've just been oblivious to? 

No, it isn't new.  Worker's comp and industrial medicine are the bottom of the food chain in the medical field. 
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Daniel De Kok
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