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The Trombone ForumTeaching & LearningPedagogy(Moderators: JP, Doug Elliott) I move a lot --- how do I get into teaching again?
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harrison.t.reed
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« on: Jun 19, 2017, 01:39PM »

I used to teach a lot. My students were good, and when things weren't meshing, I was good about finding the student a teacher with a style that worked better for them.

My first students had been referred to me through my school, when I was a high school senior, and after that I was able to build up a pretty good sized studio through word of mouth and kept teaching through college.

Even in Korea, it was easy to get students through the post school -- the Army Band has musicians who speak English so it's easy to get students.

Now I'm in Colorado Springs, and I wish I could teach ... but no school relationship seems to exist with the band here. I'm also not a local. Any tips about how to get some students?

I'd actually prefer working with adults or highly motivated high schoolers -- teaching students who are forced to take lessons has never appealed to me, and I've never needed lesson money to live off of so I could be picky in that regard. That might change how students are recruited.

I thought about placing a classified ad here, but then rethought it.
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BillO
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« Reply #1 on: Jun 20, 2017, 06:58AM »

Why not go out to the schools your self?  Put a CV and a little brochure together and go talk to the music teachers.

Also, most communities have a community activity guide that is usually a cooperative between the town, school board and the various activity groups.  That would be an ideal place to advertise and If you want to concentrate on older students, jut put that in your ad copy.

Do you have bands in your area that concentrate on beginning adults, or folks returning after a long absence?  If so they may be happy to find out there is a brass instructor about.  If not, start one.  We have one locally and they charge $7/person per practice which is billed per session.  Each session is 10-12 practices and culminates in a little friends and family concert.  For a small community like ours (~35K people) it seems very well attended with about 30 or so musicians given that they do little or no promotion.
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Never look at the conductor. You just encourage them.

Have you noticed, some folk never stick around to help tidy up after practice?
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« Reply #2 on: Jun 21, 2017, 06:07AM »

Like moving into a new gigging scene, my biggest recommendation (born from personal experience) is networking.  Musical communities tend to be fairly tight-knit; if you are able to make connections through meeting other musicians at performances, rehearsal bands, jam sessions, subbing gigs, etc, they can get to know you as a player and a person.  Assuming they have positive experiences with you they may become a resource for teaching and gigging opportunities...
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Keith Hilson
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harrison.t.reed
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« Reply #3 on: Jun 21, 2017, 07:49AM »

Good points. Thanks guys!

What do you think about making some instructional videos to promote my teaching style?
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"My technique is as good as Initial D"
T-396A - Griego 1C
88HTCL - Griego 1C
36H - DE XT105, C+, D Alto Shank
3B/F Silversonic - Griego 1A ss
pBone (with Yellow bell for bright tone)
BillO
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« Reply #4 on: Jun 21, 2017, 08:10AM »

Good points. Thanks guys!

What do you think about making some instructional videos to promote my teaching style?
Good!
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Never look at the conductor. You just encourage them.

Have you noticed, some folk never stick around to help tidy up after practice?
elmsandr

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« Reply #5 on: Jun 22, 2017, 05:48AM »

Good points. Thanks guys!

What do you think about making some instructional videos to promote my teaching style?
Maybe put a few example lessons on Youtube, could help to get some folks acquainted to you.  You could also make it a little library for items you want to reference to students later.

Talk to local music stores.  Find out who is supplying the instruments to the beginning band students in the area, they are probably the go to reference for parents.

Cheers,
Andy
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Andrew Elms
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« Reply #6 on: Jun 22, 2017, 06:56AM »

If you're going into K-12 school system, even if you're not working in one of their buildings, it may benefit you to learn about the clearances required--criminal record, child abuse, FBI fingerprinting--to work with students in that system. I should also note that requirements will likely be different for public and parochial schools.  You may not be required to get those clearances, but it may help get your foot in the door when you want to recruit students.
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Daniel De Kok
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harrison.t.reed
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« Reply #7 on: Jun 22, 2017, 07:08AM »

I didn't think I'd need anything like that if I was doing in-home lessons at the student's house.

When I used to teach a lot, the parents would be at home so they could hear what the lesson plan was and hear their kid's progress.
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"My technique is as good as Initial D"
T-396A - Griego 1C
88HTCL - Griego 1C
36H - DE XT105, C+, D Alto Shank
3B/F Silversonic - Griego 1A ss
pBone (with Yellow bell for bright tone)
EdGrissom

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« Reply #8 on: Jun 23, 2017, 04:23AM »

The music store that provides rentals/sales to beginning band students is a great place to start.   Making contact with local band directors is also a good resource. 
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« Reply #9 on: Jun 23, 2017, 07:59AM »

The music store that provides rentals/sales to beginning band students is a great place to start.   Making contact with local band directors is also a good resource.
Don't forget the independent repair shops, if there are any (you're near CIOMIT, aren't you?). Some of them are pretty well plugged in to the local scene, both at the pro level and the not-so-pro level.

Also taking some lessons from well-known player in the region (William Stanley at CU or John Sipher with the CSO) might help you start building a network.
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harrison.t.reed
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« Reply #10 on: Jun 23, 2017, 08:36AM »

Good idea. The CIOMIT guys did know lots of people.
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"My technique is as good as Initial D"
T-396A - Griego 1C
88HTCL - Griego 1C
36H - DE XT105, C+, D Alto Shank
3B/F Silversonic - Griego 1A ss
pBone (with Yellow bell for bright tone)
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« Reply #11 on: Aug 28, 2017, 07:51AM »

I'm looking into getting back into private teaching myself.  I've been teaching an elementary school kid for about a year and it's been very rewarding.  He always speaks highly of his band director, so I emailed him last week.  The director thanked me for the great job that I've been doing with his student.  He said to feel free to stop by the school and visit when I can.  I figure that when I go in I can talk to him about picking up more students.  Also, the large wind ensemble that I'm in at the Hartt Community Division is starting up again this week.  I know that there are a lot of public school music teachers there, so I will talk to them.   I've already ordered some business cards and will distribute them to everybody so that my name gets out.  I've also thought about typing up a music-related resume so that people can see my past experiences and knowledge.
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« Reply #12 on: Aug 28, 2017, 08:01AM »

Not sure if this exactly was mentioned, but perhaps arrange to perform as a guest soloist with the local high school band in concert? That might get you a lot of referrals.

...or not...

...probably not...

...Geezer
« Last Edit: Aug 30, 2017, 01:11PM by Geezerhorn » Logged

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