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Author Topic: Music Education with or without performance  (Read 4975 times)
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« Reply #20 on: Feb 10, 2014, 07:14AM »

There are some scholarships for education people if you want to work in an underprivileged area upon graduation.  I looked into it awhile ago when I was contemplating doing that myself.  I don't remember where I found it to be honest, sorry I can't be of more help.

NYC has a program like that I believe. One caveat with those programs, their retention is not exactly great. Take Teach For America for example.

http://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2011/10/04/kappan_donaldson.html
Quote
How long are TFA teachers’ careers?
We expected to find that a large proportion of TFA teachers in our sample would have left teaching after completing their two-year obligation to TFA. But, we found that 60.5% of teachers taught in K-12 schools longer than two years and more than one third (35.5%) taught for more than four years. After five years, 27.8% were still in teaching. This retention rate is markedly lower than the 50% estimated for new teachers across all types of schools (Smith & Ingersoll, 2003). Good data are not currently available that would allow us to compare TFA teachers’ turnover to teachers’ turnover in similar high-poverty schools, although reports from Philadelphia suggest that the rates may be roughly comparable (Neild, Useem, Travers, & Lesnick, 2003).
https://www.teachforamerica.org/sites/default/files/Research_on_Teach_For_America_2012_1.pdf
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2010 • Teach For America: A Review of the Evidence: Julian Vasquez Heilig and Su Jin Jez; Great Lakes
Center for Education Research & Practice
 
The authors conducted a meta-analysis of previous research on the classroom impact
of Teach For America. The two main takeaways were: 1) retention rates for Teach For
America teachers are low
; and 2) corps members’ student achievement results are, at
best, mixed.

The reason specifically is that these are hard schools to teach at, and they can really take their toll, sap your passions, and burn you out.

In NC, there used to be a state program called "teaching fellows" to encourage new teachers in general, and gave a full ride if they taught 4 years in the state after graduation. That was a great program. No debt, choice of schools, and added support. Ones that require you to go to the schools no one else wants... be very careful. There are some very good reasons why people don't take those positions if they have a choice.

Otherwise, I'd have to second Exzaclee. Despite all the hype you get about college rankings in high school, the only questions I've had in my professional life through multiple careers are: 1) do you have a college degree? 2) what is it in? That's it.
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Matt K

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« Reply #21 on: Feb 10, 2014, 01:17PM »

That doesn't seem like it's much lower than regular teacher rates to be honest  :/

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What's in a name? that which we call a tenor-bass posaune
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« Reply #22 on: Feb 11, 2014, 06:39PM »

...not to be nit picky here - but I seem to remember SUNY Potsdam (Crane)giving 60 minute lessons to all studio members. Ed or performance - it didn't matter. I don't know if that was the instructors call or if that was a school policy.
30 minutes goes by really fast - I find it hard to believe that college students would get anything less than a 30 minute lesson. Well...of course unless it was a DAILY lesson for 30 minutes...
I was a horrible practice until I got to college. I quickly learned that 2,3-4 hours a day was going to be necessary!
I loved college - would go back in a heart beat - if I could get in  :/
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Andrew Pacht

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« Reply #23 on: Feb 11, 2014, 07:13PM »

...not to be nit picky here - but I seem to remember SUNY Potsdam (Crane)giving 60 minute lessons to all studio members. Ed or performance - it didn't matter. I don't know if that was the instructors call or if that was a school policy.
30 minutes goes by really fast - I find it hard to believe that college students would get anything less than a 30 minute lesson. Well...of course unless it was a DAILY lesson for 30 minutes...

I talked with the professors at the school that only had 30 minute lessons for ed, and one of the teachers told me that he does 45 minutes instead of the 30 minute lessons.  He also told me that in the near future, all music majors will get hour lessons.  It's something the school hasn't done while most other schools do it.
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Andrew Pacht
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« Reply #24 on: Apr 18, 2014, 11:36AM »

Andrew-
Did you make a decision?
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« Reply #25 on: Apr 18, 2014, 01:53PM »

It has been said already but I'll second those who have said it by saying it in a different way......if you plan to teach, the school you attend is not going to make a whole lot of difference. What will make a difference is how you handle your self as a student and as a student teacher. More importantly you want people to give you a good recommendation. Having taught for 36 years and supervised student teachers I always tell them when they  do their observations, practicums, student teaching, etc., DON"T MESS UP. Everyone of them are teaching. Nothing pleases me more than when the cooperating teacher says the student teaching experience was a pleasant experience for them and they would like more.

If you want to perform go study with the people who do it. My son has studied with the likes of Peter  Sullivan, James Kraft, and John Kitzman........he is performing in an orchestra and teaching at two colleges.....all at the tender age of 26. Again....don't mess up!

By the way.....I have a Masters in music education from Ithaca......Ranking with my diploma, the most important piece of paper I got from them was my permanent licensure for teaching music K-12 in New York........and a great big thanks to Dr. Jack Bullock.
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Ron Smith, D.M.A.
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Andrew Pacht

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« Reply #26 on: Apr 18, 2014, 08:09PM »

Andrew-
Did you make a decision?


I actually made a decision about two hours ago!

I'll be going to SUNY Fredonia for music education!! (No double major)

My parents have offered to cover room and board for my undergrad, so I will be left with less than $20,000 in debt from tuition!!
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Andrew Pacht
SUNY Fredonia Class of 2018 - Music Education
Rondout Valley High School
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« Reply #27 on: Apr 19, 2014, 08:44AM »

Congratulations! Best of luck to you in the next 4 years!
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« Reply #28 on: Apr 19, 2014, 11:01AM »

Bravo! Andrew!! You made a wise decision.
Get as much as you can from the SUNY system! Keep track of your course credits. Mistakes happen on the admin side - so this is important.
As my parents said, "College is the best time of your life." Especially for music majors! Once you leave the college arena for a professional one you wont be surrounded by as many like minded folk.
Play as much as you can! Duets, trios, quartets, trombone ensemble. Do it all.
Best of luck in all you do! Come back to the TTF and let us know how you are doing  :D

Sam
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« Reply #29 on: Apr 19, 2014, 09:10PM »

Tell Dr. Deemer hello!!!  :)
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« Reply #30 on: May 03, 2014, 08:50AM »

Hey Andrew congrats on choosing Fredonia, I am a sophomore trombone music education major at Fredonia and it is a great program. If you have any questions feel free to contact me. 
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