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Author Topic: Place of the trombone in small combos  (Read 2740 times)
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LowrBrass

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« Reply #20 on: May 02, 2017, 05:57AM »

I'm just a random weirdo on the internet, so take this with a grain of salt, but no, I don't think it's a good idea for you to switch to trumpet. (Although learning to double probably isn't a terrible idea.)


(1) You can always still teach. The lack of opportunities for trombones in small combos and the air problems you're describing wouldn't prevent you from teaching. No need to switch instruments for that.

(2) Everyone has their strengths and weaknesses. You may envy your colleagues' air capacities, but I'll bet some of them envy your tone, your articulations, your agility, etc. There are a lot of different aspects to playing trombone. I don't know your exact situation, but I wouldn't completely give up just because you're having trouble with one aspect.

(3) If you ARE ready to give up just because you're having trouble with one aspect, I doubt switching to another instrument will help. I can almost guarantee that you'll run into problems with trumpet, too.

(4) If you drop trombone and switch to trumpet now, your development will be YEARS behind other professional trumpet players. There will be more opportunities for a good trombone player who sometimes has to take a breath in the middle of a long phrase than for a lousy trumpet player.

(5) My advice? Dig in and work on your weakest qualities. Talk to your teacher, do breath control exercises. Take up running, take up swimming. None of this will be fixed by tomorrow. Work hard and be patient with yourself.

(5a) And get a smaller trombone for jazz.
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bonenick

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« Reply #21 on: May 02, 2017, 06:44AM »

I'm just a random weirdo on the internet, so take this with a grain of salt, but no, I don't think it's a good idea for you to switch to trumpet. (Although learning to double probably isn't a terrible idea.)


(1) You can always still teach. The lack of opportunities for trombones in small combos and the air problems you're describing wouldn't prevent you from teaching. No need to switch instruments for that.

(2) Everyone has their strengths and weaknesses. You may envy your colleagues' air capacities, but I'll bet some of them envy your tone, your articulations, your agility, etc. There are a lot of different aspects to playing trombone. I don't know your exact situation, but I wouldn't completely give up just because you're having trouble with one aspect.

(3) If you ARE ready to give up just because you're having trouble with one aspect, I doubt switching to another instrument will help. I can almost guarantee that you'll run into problems with trumpet, too.

(4) If you drop trombone and switch to trumpet now, your development will be YEARS behind other professional trumpet players. There will be more opportunities for a good trombone player who sometimes has to take a breath in the middle of a long phrase than for a lousy trumpet player.

(5) My advice? Dig in and work on your weakest qualities. Talk to your teacher, do breath control exercises. Take up running, take up swimming. None of this will be fixed by tomorrow. Work hard and be patient with yourself.

(5a) And get a smaller trombone for jazz.

Lots of good old common sense. Especially #4.

Being a musician is a tough job. Even more than it was 30 years ago. No matter what you do, you'll have tough competition. If you are not ready for it, go get a day job. If you do, go and work it out.
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Dixieland57
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« Reply #22 on: May 02, 2017, 07:47AM »

I only play trombone since 2 years
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LowrBrass

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« Reply #23 on: May 03, 2017, 07:24PM »

Well, then you're already years behind most of your competition. 

...Which could explain why they're better at some things, like breath control.



Don't know


Good luck.
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Dixieland57
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« Reply #24 on: May 04, 2017, 03:39AM »

Thank you
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sonicsilver
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« Reply #25 on: Jun 17, 2017, 03:49PM »

Trombone/flute sounds really nice as frontmen. Trombone/sop sax too. They're like male and female voices.
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Arrowhead99
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« Reply #26 on: Jun 18, 2017, 06:17AM »

Hi, after having seen lots of jazz concert, a question crossed my mind.

Why in small jazz combos it's always sax and trumpet and never sax and trombone.

Does trombone have a place in small combos?

Really good question! A few, brief thoughts on this....

I would say it's partially lack of knowledge of what the trombone can do. The images of Bird and Diz have been so prevalent over the years that it sort of helps to reinforce the idea of "trumpet and sax only."

The sound of the trombone does not project/cut like a trumpet or sax does. Back in the 40's and 50's not only was there the technical abilities of the player to play the faster tempos, but also the plethora of audio equipment was not easily accessible (like it is today) which made it even more difficult to be heard. Also, rhythm sections don't always know how to play quieter to adjust to different instruments. Because of all this, it helped delay the evolution of the trombone in it's adaptation to post WW2 Jazz.

It usually takes trombone players a little bit longer to learn how to play Jazz, then it does Tpt or Sax.

The role of education. Years ago, the Jamey Aeborsold play-a-longs were really part of mainstream jazz education. Any student wanting to learn how to play improv were told to start with those. The problem with it is, the Jamey Aeborsolds tended to focus heavily on the Bop period and forward, as if there was no Jazz before 1945!!
Jazz coming out of New Orleans had a heavy emphasis on using the trombone, along with collective improvisation. Schools and universities tend to focus the later style of Jazz (if it's new, it must be better!!! :-0).

If you want to hear trombone jazz, go to New Orleans! You'll hear trombones everywhere! It's awesome!
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harrison.t.reed
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« Reply #27 on: Jun 18, 2017, 08:10AM »

I thinking of switching to trumpet because the more work available and to physical reason, I'm 5"4 and struggle with air ,don't know what to do...



I know it's late in the game for this reply, but it's about the music, not about what you're playing. You can get work in a jazz combo playing the ukulele -- you just need to make music that works in the group.
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