Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length

 
Advanced search

1069469 Posts in 70963 Topics- by 18768 Members - Latest Member: smurfdad
Jump to:  
The Trombone ForumTeaching & LearningPractice Room(Moderator: blast) Different Style on Different Days?
Pages: [1]   Go Down
Print
Author Topic: Different Style on Different Days?  (Read 423 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Krazzikk

*
Offline Offline

Location: Florida, USA
Joined: Apr 2, 2017
Posts: 15

View Profile
« on: May 28, 2017, 09:51PM »

Hey guys,

Recently I've been debating whether to alternate my focus day by day, focusing on my jazz playing one day, and classical the next, or just sectioning time for both.

What are your guy's thoughts? I don't perform that often since I mostly don't gig, and I'm in highschool, but maybe most of you here don't have time to practice only one style per day?

I feel like I am more focused when I'm set in one 'mode' for that day. I have my jazz mode and my classical mode, but maybe that's just in my head and there's a benefit to practicing both my classical playing and jazz playing. I'd like this to be an open discussion (not just one regarding me personally), but just for reference, I'm the first chair in both my highschool's concert band and jazz band and I also perform at solo and ensemble festivals annually as well as occasional jazz jams. I'm also starting a jazz combo so I've been particularly working on learning tunes and improvising.
Logged
Doug Elliott
Lord of the Rims

*
*
Offline Offline

Location: Silver Spring, MD
Joined: Mar 12, 2005
Posts: 6430

View Profile
« Reply #1 on: May 28, 2017, 10:05PM »

I think I like that idea.  Focusing on one thing for a longer period would probably get you more progress on it.
Logged

www.DougElliottMouthpieces.com
XT LexanN104,C+,D2, Williams 6, K&H Slokar alto, K&H Slokar Solo .547 open wrap
bigbassbone1

*
Offline Offline

Location: melbourne, australia
Joined: Sep 7, 2012
Posts: 846

View Profile
« Reply #2 on: May 29, 2017, 12:20AM »

Im always jealous of players who are competent in both "classical" and "jazz" styles, whatever those terms mean. Having said that though, I feel like I can count on one hand the people I know who are REALLY good at both and are successfully professional in both areas.

I know you said general comments not necessarily directed at you were desirable, but I think really it would work on a case by case basis. If you are looking to be employed in one area or another, I would spend the majority of my practice and preparation time solely on that style and maybe leave a little time at the end of the day to put a few minutes of focus into the other. Just as an example, if you are hoping to be employed as a classical performer and are splitting your time so that every second day you are solely focusing on jazz playing, you are handicapping yourself in what I think is quite a major way because you will be competing against players who will want those jobs and be spending ALL of their practice time preparing to be competitive in that area of employment.

Of course, as a specialist in either style you need to have a certain level of competancy in the other, its important, but if it comes down to one being your major source of income I think one style would need to be secondary.

If you are the kind of player who plays for fun, or trombone is not a primary source of income, then I think its a great idea! Being competant in  both styles gives you a much wider range of gigs to accept and I think playing would be more enjoyable.

I just want to stress again, i am not saying that if you do play trombone for a living you should ignore completely one style in favor of another but be aware of where you stand competitively against others and adjust your practice time accordingly.
Logged
Geordie
*
Offline Offline

Location:
Joined: Nov 14, 2015
Posts: 72

View Profile
« Reply #3 on: May 29, 2017, 01:24AM »

Alternating styles makes sense as long as you do the basics eg long tones, flexibilities, scales for part of every day.
Logged
Geezerhorn

*
Offline Offline

Location: PA
Joined: Feb 9, 2012
Posts: 5200
"Lego My Trombone"


View Profile
« Reply #4 on: May 29, 2017, 04:34AM »

You could even take it a step further. When in your "jazz" mode, alternate styles. Try alternately playing like JJ, Urbie, Carl, Frank, etc. Do you know what elements makes each of their playing different from each other in terms of tone, articulation, phrasing, note selection, etc? It will take a lot of serious listening. Or maybe just pick one favorite out and try to play like they might.

...Geezer
Logged

Krazzikk

*
Offline Offline

Location: Florida, USA
Joined: Apr 2, 2017
Posts: 15

View Profile
« Reply #5 on: May 29, 2017, 05:01AM »

I know you said general comments not necessarily directed at you were desirable, but I think really it would work on a case by case basis. If you are looking to be employed in one area or another, I would spend the majority of my practice and preparation time solely on that style and maybe leave a little time at the end of the day to put a few minutes of focus into the other. Just as an example, if you are hoping to be employed as a classical performer and are splitting your time so that every second day you are solely focusing on jazz playing, you are handicapping yourself in what I think is quite a major way because you will be competing against players who will want those jobs and be spending ALL of their practice time preparing to be competitive in that area of employment.

Of course, as a specialist in either style you need to have a certain level of competancy in the other, its important, but if it comes down to one being your major source of income I think one style would need to be secondary.

If you are the kind of player who plays for fun, or trombone is not a primary source of income, then I think its a great idea! Being competant in  both styles gives you a much wider range of gigs to accept and I think playing would be more enjoyable.

I just want to stress again, i am not saying that if you do play trombone for a living you should ignore completely one style in favor of another but be aware of where you stand competitively against others and adjust your practice time accordingly.
Thanks for the insight. I think the problem comes from the fact that I'm really not to sure what I want to play in my professional life. Sometimes I feel like I'm leaning one way or the other but I really love both.

You could even take it a step further. When in your "jazz" mode, alternate styles. Try alternately playing like JJ, Urbie, Carl, Frank, etc. Do you know what elements makes each of their playing different from each other in terms of tone, articulation, phrasing, note selection, etc? It will take a lot of serious listening. Or maybe just pick one favorite out and try to play like they might.
Ooo, I like this idea. That made me think of trying improvising, and trying to switch between the style of two trombonists conversationally. Wycliffe Gordon  and Tommy Dorsey stick out in my mind as having very distinct playing, but I'm not sure how well they'd mix.
Logged
Exzaclee

*
Offline Offline

Location: Edmond, OK
Joined: Mar 8, 2008
Posts: 6468
"Check out my new website!"


View Profile
« Reply #6 on: May 29, 2017, 08:19AM »

Don't think about style.

Think about "what music does it for me?"

Find an album you really like and learn it. If it's a classical album, learn it - every part, every piece, every which way.

If it's a jazz album, do the same - transcribe as deeply as you can. Sing every part, then play them.

Focus on learning what you want to learn, on learning to sing what moves you. Let that guide you, not some constrictive stylistic construct.
Logged

Music is my mistress, and she plays second fiddle to no one!
www.zacleemusic.com
Geezerhorn

*
Offline Offline

Location: PA
Joined: Feb 9, 2012
Posts: 5200
"Lego My Trombone"


View Profile
« Reply #7 on: May 30, 2017, 04:26AM »



Steve Martin; the entertainer famously known for being "constricted" by style.  :)

...Geezer
Logged

Pages: [1]   Go Up
Print
Jump to: