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The Trombone ForumTeaching & LearningPractice Room(Moderator: blast) How to practice the 3rd mvt. of the Bourgeois Concerto
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goldentone
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« on: Jun 14, 2017, 04:21PM »

The title says it all... playing music like the 3rd mvt of the Bourgeois has always been a weakness of mine. Lots of notes that go by fast. Awkward slide movements combined with multiple tonguing. Just interested to hear how you all practice this. Thanks.
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harrison.t.reed
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« Reply #1 on: Jun 14, 2017, 04:33PM »

I actually double tongue it. Lots of alternate positions present themselves if you try to move as far in one direction as possible before changing directions. This style of approach lends itself to memorizing it, or at least practicing until it's basically memorized even if you aren't confident enough to play it without the music.
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« Reply #2 on: Jun 14, 2017, 04:39PM »

Bass or tenor one? I just performed the bass one recently. If thats the one you are talking about, LOTS of slow practice. Its so important to be precise with this kind of music, so many players play this kind of stuff, kind of faking their way through fast passages and sacrificing tone quality to make certain registers work. Its really impressive if everything is stable, clear and even. Spend time making it REALLY good at super slow tempos, and gradually speed it up over the course of weeks. Don't sacrifice ANYTHING for speed in the practice room. Playing it fast is not hard if you compromise.... just be patient and diligent in striving for perfection. Speed will come if you introduce it gradually.
If you are double/triple tonguing at the faster tempo, make sure you are doing that also when practicing slow.
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Sliphorn
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« Reply #3 on: Jun 14, 2017, 08:21PM »

I also double tongue it.  SLOWLY.  Then over the course of time you can speed it up.  Once it's muscle memory, it'll be a lot better.
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sonicsilver
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« Reply #4 on: Jun 15, 2017, 05:58AM »

....LOTS of slow practice. Its so important to be precise with this kind of music, so many players play this kind of stuff, kind of faking their way through fast passages and sacrificing tone quality to make certain registers work. Its really impressive if everything is stable, clear and even. Spend time making it REALLY good at super slow tempos, and gradually speed it up over the course of weeks. Don't sacrifice ANYTHING for speed in the practice room. Playing it fast is not hard if you compromise.... just be patient and diligent in striving for perfection. Speed will come if you introduce it gradually.
If you are double/triple tonguing at the faster tempo, make sure you are doing that also when practicing slow.

Excellent post. Well said.
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