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The Trombone ForumCreation and PerformanceThe Business of Music(Moderator: BGuttman) Ringling folding, 800ish jobs gone
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timothy42b
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« Reply #60 on: Jan 17, 2017, 07:58AM »

When I was young I looked forward to a chance to go to the circus.

Later on it became a bit pricey and I didn't go as often, but I still thought of it fondly.

I don't think it has the mass appeal that it once did.  I think that's kind of a generational thing. 

So if there is a lack of market, profitability goes down, eventually businesses close.  Sad to see the end of an era though. 
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Tim Richardson
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« Reply #61 on: Jan 17, 2017, 11:13AM »

I think the golden age of the circus was when there was a large rural population and no television. If your lifestyle was getting up at dawn to feed, milk, and hay, then going to bed at dusk, the 'circus coming to town' must have been quite a spectacular (in the literal sense) event.

I'd still rather look at a circus than a video game, but kids probably get jaded when they can be wildly entertained through their whole waking hours, and see every possible and impossible thing accomplished with CGI. It seems like the things they'd do to modernize a circus would also make it more similar to other forms of entertainment. I'm sorry to see it go.
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« Reply #62 on: Jan 17, 2017, 11:34AM »

Their competition for family entertainment at the arena typically involves fewer people and moving parts: Globetrotters and Disney On Ice can likely break even with a MUCH smaller draw.

Their competition in the circus realm, namely Cirque du Soleil, appears to involve fewer people as well. They also have long runs in their own facilities, modern marketing, generally the appearance of a well oiled machine. Plus nothing on the animal side, where transportation and care costs are likely huge. No trains to maintain, for starters.

There are still small circuses around that set up their own tents down by the freeway, generally geared towards Latin American audiences around here. We also have local performing groups in circus acrobatics, fire arts, etc. that perform elements of a circus. Not all under one big top, alas, but these talents have outlets. 

It's sad for me to see a group disband, as opposed to "adapt and perform," but I suppose there's a time and place for everything. There's always a chance the name is revived down the road with a new, sustainable type of show.

 :)
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« Reply #63 on: Jan 17, 2017, 12:00PM »

http://www.circusmusic.org/index.htm

"The Windjammers Unlimited is a 501(c)3 historical music society that is dedicated to the preservation of traditional music of the circus. This music is kept alive via live performances and recording sessions at the annual convention and summer meetings."

They just inducted Keith Green to their Hall of Fame.  Keith was the Red Unit's Bandleader through the time I used to play the circus in DC and Baltimore, and I think for many years after that.  He played trumpet on the show but he had also been a trombone player  - just like Brett Barlow, the current Red Unit Bandleader.

I would hate to see the tradition become merely "history."

I'm going to write an article for Windjammers, I think for their Feb/Mar editions. It'll be about what the modern circus band is (was) like. If I get a copy I'll share it :)
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« Reply #64 on: Jan 17, 2017, 12:01PM »

This topic has continued to run off the rails whilst I slept. I am not impressed with any of those commenting away from the direct issue of a business closing and leading to the loss of employment .
I don't want to shut this, but I will if it runs away again.

Chris Stearn

Understood. I'm very sorry for the trouble.
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BGuttman
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« Reply #65 on: Jan 17, 2017, 01:29PM »

Animal discussions go here: https://tromboneforum.org/index.php/topic,97476.0.html

Let's keep this to a discussion of RBBB folding and why.
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Bruce Guttman
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boneagain
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« Reply #66 on: Jan 17, 2017, 02:35PM »

A big "thank you" to Euph for starting a needed thread in a part of the forum he doesn't regularly follow!
« Last Edit: Jan 19, 2017, 03:05PM by boneagain » Logged

Dave Adams
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« Reply #67 on: Jan 18, 2017, 06:59AM »



I think I'll keep this on my little toy train layout for old-time's sake.

Not to sound grubby or insensitive, but I have to wonder if all of the B&B circus ephemera will suddenly go up in value.

...Geezer
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« Reply #68 on: Jan 19, 2017, 06:08AM »

Too soon?

Well, think about this. You will still have to put food on your table. I'm not posting about you having "sticky fingers". I'm posting about people giving you things they have a right to give to you - like a Ring Master's uniform? An elephant's head-dress? A lion-tamer's whip? A clown's tricycle? A B&B bass drum? Etc. I'm imagining all those things having value on the collector's market.

Sure, you're used to seeing all those things every day and probably take them for granted. Soon enough, sadly, it will all be gone. Look at stuff with fresh eyes. Maybe selling some collectible stuff given to you can be a little "severance pay" that you probably otherwise will not get.

About 25 years ago, wife & I took an Amazon river cruise. One day, after re-boarding the boat, I saw a young lady with a native tribal drum. She traded a portable radio for it. What a souvenir!!! Now that was using her brains! Just sayin'...

...Geezer
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« Reply #69 on: Jan 19, 2017, 07:40AM »



About 25 years ago, wife & I took an Amazon river cruise. One day, after re-boarding the boat, I saw a young lady with a native tribal drum. She traded a portable radio for it. What a souvenir!!! Now that was using her brains! Just sayin'...

...Geezer

And somewhere in Africa, on the Swahili language "native tribal drum forum," someone is writing:


"I had Chinese-made 'tribal-drum-shaped object' that I trade for perfectly good radio. Gotta love tourists!"
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« Reply #70 on: Jan 19, 2017, 07:52AM »

And somewhere in Africa, on the Swahili language "native tribal drum forum," someone is writing:


"I had Chinese-made 'tribal-drum-shaped object' that I trade for perfectly good radio. Gotta love tourists!"

Lol. Usually. But in the above case I referenced, it was an 18-year old tribal chief. Quite an amazing young man - to be recognized by his tribe as chief as such an early age! The drum was certainly hand-made and used for tribal ceremonies. But being their chief, he realized that another drum could easily be made, while a radio (actually a small boom-box) could bring the world to his people. I believe he got the better deal and will, no doubt, be encouraging the members of his tribe to make things to trade for batteries on the next boat visit!

Anyway, my example was that many of us thought that drum was unobtainable. Everyone except that young lady - who knew how to approach them and knew what they really needed. And my point is that while the OP might be taking everything around her for granted, soon it will all be gone. And although those articles and others of their kind might seem unobtainable to her - you never know until you try.

...Geezer
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« Reply #71 on: Jan 19, 2017, 08:22AM »

Closing a business down is like killing something. I have been though it. It is painful, difficult and sad. The process of trying different things to stay in the game without giving up what you do is a often a lost cause. Realizing that the financial loses will devastate everything left in a sinking ship is an inevitable occurrence. Telling all the workers that there jobs are over is a very terrible thing to have to do. The worst thing is you cannot leak a possible closing to the workers or all your credit lines, customers and suppliers will abandon you effectively forcing a sooner close.

For me my company was a medium size graphics company. As regulations and taxes took more from the pie we tried to grow to make the overhead big enough to handle it. Then the collections process in the court system just killed us. We were a two generation company with long time employees.

This Circus made itself a legacy that entertained the world. The world changed and gave up on the Circus.

Again, closing a business down is like killing something.     
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ronnies
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« Reply #72 on: Jan 19, 2017, 11:41AM »

And somewhere in Africa, on the Swahili language "native tribal drum forum," someone is writing:


"I had Chinese-made 'tribal-drum-shaped object' that I trade for perfectly good radio. Gotta love tourists!"

I always thought the Amazon was in South America. :-)

Ronnie
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« Reply #73 on: Jan 19, 2017, 11:50AM »

I always thought the Amazon was in South America. :-)
I think that just makes the story better.
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« Reply #74 on: Jan 19, 2017, 06:00PM »

I always thought the Amazon was in South America. :-)

Ronnie

Ohhhhh!! I thought he meant he bought the tickets on Amazon.com!!!


Not really. You know---Americans and geography. We're always in de-Nile. We're also quite Volga!!
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« Reply #75 on: Jan 19, 2017, 06:11PM »

I don't see what your problem is, Euph.  The tourist swapped a Chinese made Boombox shaped opject for a Chinese made natimve drum shaped object.  The tourist could have spent more at the Souvenir Shop for an identical drum.

Everybody won.  The tourist got something not easily found at home and a source of great memories.  The Chief got a nice gewgaw that will entertain him until it needs new batteries (or maybe he can hook it up to a generator). ;-)
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Bruce Guttman
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« Reply #76 on: Jan 23, 2017, 08:58AM »

I enjoyed your Circus Band Blog very much! I too subbed in the circus band years ago, and it was a good experience! Your photos were fantastic too. The tragedy here is another loss to live music and the musicians that it employed.... But thank you so much for taking the time to do the blog and the photos. It was very enjoyable.
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« Reply #77 on: Jan 23, 2017, 01:40PM »

I enjoyed your Circus Band Blog very much! I too subbed in the circus band years ago, and it was a good experience! Your photos were fantastic too. The tragedy here is another loss to live music and the musicians that it employed.... But thank you so much for taking the time to do the blog and the photos. It was very enjoyable.

Thanks! I'm glad you like it :)
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"Passion is born from earnestness.
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